Ran Lee

Taiwan’s Father of Muay Thai
:::

2018 / July

Camille Kuo /photos courtesy of Lin Min-hsuan /tr. by Geof Aberhart


What comes to mind when you hear the name “muay Thai”? Despite its reputation for ferocity, the muay Thai practiced at Ran Lee Muay­thai Gym in Kao­hsiung is nowhere near as brutal as what you’ve seen in the movies. In fact, even people with high blood pressure can take part!

Gym leader Ran Lee studied orthodox muay Thai in Myan­mar and Thailand. As the art began to grow in popularity inter­nation­ally, Lee brought it to Taiwan, earning him the title of “father of muay Thai in Taiwan.” He has taught muay Thai for over 17 years now, and among his many students in that time he can count even a bodyguard of an ROC president. Lee’s students have also put in excellent showings at both muay Thai and ­sanda (Chinese kickboxing) events at home and abroad, building quite a reputation for their art.

 


Stepping into Ran Lee Muay­thai Gym, I am immediately struck by the smell of lini­ment that fills the air. Gym leader Ran Lee sits on the floor repairing protective gear for his students as the afternoon sun pours in. It is a peaceful scene quite at odds with most ­people’s impressions of muay Thai. In comparison with other combat sports like boxing or ­sanda, there are fewer rules in competitive muay Thai. Punches, kicks, knees, and elbows can all be used at extremely close range, which means the fighters’ blows remain incredibly power­ful and the chance of drawing blood is high, contributing to the general perception of muay Thai as a brutal art.

The modern, ring-based form began to gain popularity worldwide in the 1960s. However, relatively few people in Taiwan engaged with the sport, so Ran Lee began by putting muay Thai techniques to use in boxing matches. It was this that earned him recognition as the founding father of Taiwanese muay Thai.

Learning from a master

At age ten, the Myanmar-born Lee began studying Chinese kung fu and lethwei (Burmese kickboxing), only switching to muay Thai after he moved to Taiwan, where he saw a piece on the National Geographic Channel about muay Thai legend Apidej Sit-Hirun of Thailand. Sit-Hirun racked up an impressive 340 career wins and at one point held a total of seven muay Thai and boxing titles at the same time. To this day, no one in the muay Thai world has been able to match Sit-Hirun’s achievements. Lee was immediately drawn to Sit-Hirun and jumped on a flight to Thailand to ask the champion to take him on as a student.

His training in Thailand saw him spend ten hours in intense muay Thai training each day. It was almost too much to physically bear. “The hardest part was getting over injuries. If I injured my shin, for example, then I had to take it as a sign I hadn’t toughened that area up enough, so I had to train harder,” says Lee about that time.

Fortunately, with his background in lethwei, Lee was able to learn at a more rapid pace, and soon he was back in Taiwan. “I love Thailand. I consider Thailand my third home; Taiwan’s my second.”

Experiencing the differences

To the Thai people, muay Thai can be a profession, while most Taiwanese study it as a form of exercise or to get in shape, and so their approach to it is vastly different from the Thai approach.

That said, there is one big advantage to learning muay Thai in Taiwan—with Taiwan being comparatively more affluent and having a national health insurance system, there are better healthcare options open to oft-injured fighters. “You don’t have to worry about the medical side; you can just focus on training and becoming a champion,” says Lee.

Respect above all

Ran Lee Muay­thai Gym focuses on fist- and footwork. “Clinches are the essence of muay Thai,” says Lee, “and fist­work and footwork are the fundamental techniques.” If your footwork is solid, then your punches will be too. Some 70% of our muscles are in the lower body, and by strengthening the thighs through legwork, you can not only improve circulation but also develop the physical strength muay Thai demands. Once the foundations are laid, Lee then works with students one on one, because only by wielding the pads himself can he really tailor the training to the student.

Ran Lee Muay­thai Gym’s guiding principle is, “When learning an art, first learn the rules; when learning to fight, first learn to be moral.” Those eager to learn muay Thai will learn through basic training to “subdue their minds,” as Buddhist scripture puts it. Trainer Aldo ­Huang began his martial arts studies learning tai chi in junior high. By his own estimations, he got pretty good at it. Then he joined Ran Lee’s gym and challenged the students there, but they mopped the floor with him. He felt he had to go back to basics and reevaluate everything he’d learned. In his seven years studying muay Thai, ­Huang says his biggest takeaway has been that “muay Thai has given me a new attitude toward life. It’s taught me to be more settled and more thoughtful, and to try to avoid fighting, but not fear it.”

“Coach teaches us to be ethical and filial.” Another of Lee’s students, Chiu Ting-chu, has been studying with Lee for many years and describes him as someone worthy of learning from in terms of how he interacts with people and deals with situations as well as in muay Thai. Lee works with a wide variety of people, with students from over 20 countries whose professions include judges, professional military personnel, and police officers.

International tournaments

“Muay Thai emphasizes practicality and must be tested in combat,” says Lee. Studying in isolation can never create true improvement of skills or mentality—only by challenging yourself in actual competition can you really grow. Lee frequently encourages his students to compete. “The more you fight, the better you know yourself and the more humble you get, because you realize you don’t actually know all that much,” says student Ann Hou.

Seeing how nimble the 28-year-old Hou is, it’s hard to imagine that when she first joined the gym she weighed 85 kilos, yet the coach asked straight out if she wanted to compete. Over the next year and change, she spared no effort to get to her fighting weight, 57 kg. “The hardest part of competing, I would say, is cutting weight. I see everyone pigging out and I’m stuck just drinking water,” says Hou. However, once she stepped into the ring, all those worries were behind her, and the hard work proved to be all worth it when she stepped out a winner.

Another of Lee’s students, Luo Qi­rong, made it to the final match of the 2012 Hong Kong Supreme Fight Championship, ultimately being defeated by HK fighter Chan Kai Tik for the Asian Gold Belt. Chan was a world amateur muay Thai champion, and was technically superior to Luo, “But Luo kept at it the whole way through and was an even match for him,” says Lee in praise of Luo’s impressive achievement.

Living the muay Thai spirit

Competitive muay Thai fights go five rounds, with the last one deciding the winner. Even if you lose all four of the previous ones, if you can take that fifth round, you win. This setup is a display of the spirit of muay Thai: perseverance. As Lee says, you don’t know the final score until the end.

New student ­Chuang Fu-jen admits that “the training is really grueling; even just doing the stretches makes me want to cry.” ­Chuang suffers from high blood pressure and took up muay Thai for his health. In just four months he has been able to get his condition under control, and his doctor even gave permission for him to cut down on his medication. Studying muay Thai is about training your willpower, and that is then reflected in both life and work. If you can make it through the pain of training, what can’t you make it through?

Promoting Taiwanese muay Thai

How muay Thai is promoted is something that has been changing with the times. Lee is now often invited to gyms to give demonstrations; to orphanages to show his ram muay, the traditional “dance” performed before fights in honor of the fighter’s teacher; and to college muay Thai clubs as a consultant, helping more and more people get familiar with the sport.

Even now that he has settled in Kao­hsiung and is raising a family, Ran Lee’s life is still focused on muay Thai education. Every night as class gets under way, the scent of the students’ sweat replaces the smell of liniment that otherwise pervades the gym. Even when the pain of yesterday’s practice is still fresh, Lee pushes on, realizing the spirit of muay Thai: perseverance, to the very end!

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

繁體中文 日文

泰拳教育在台灣

文‧郭玉平 圖‧林旻萱

你印象裡的泰拳是什麼樣的運動呢?一向以凶悍著稱的泰拳,在高雄仁李泰拳館裡,並沒有電影中的殘暴對打景象,反而是連高血壓患者都能天天操練的武術。

館長李智仁是緬甸華僑,年輕時於緬甸及泰國習得正統泰拳功夫,在國際泰拳風氣興起之際將泰拳帶進台灣,因此獲「台灣泰拳教父」的尊稱。他教拳超過17年,桃李滿門,包含總統貼身隨扈在內,學員們積極參與國內外泰拳和散打賽事,打出泰拳一片天。

 

 


走進台灣仁李泰拳館,空氣中瀰漫著痠痛藥膏的氣味,館長李智仁席地為學員敲打釘補護具,午後日光灑落,這和平的場景和多數人對泰拳的印象大相逕庭。泰國的傳統搏擊技術相對於拳擊、散打等技擊術,比賽規則少,可在極短距離使用拳、腳、膝、肘進行攻擊,保有戰鬥民族徒手搏擊的殺傷力,因此受傷流血的機率高,所以,泰拳常被評為「狠辣兇殘」。

現今流行的「擂台泰拳」,又稱「商業泰拳」,規定選手必須配戴拳套,安全性提高,並在60年代風靡全球。雖然如此,台灣接觸泰拳的人卻不多,於是有東南亞血統的李智仁首開先河,將泰式拳法運用在拳擊比賽中,被公認是台灣泰拳史最悠久的開山祖師。

向泰國拳王亞批勒拜師學拳

李智仁是緬甸華僑,受到李小龍電影的啟迪,10歲開始在緬甸學習中國功夫和緬甸拳。

轉型練泰拳則是在移民台灣後。李智仁看到《國家地理雜誌》頻道介紹泰國國寶級拳王亞批勒.寶希蘭(Apidej Sit-hirun),亞批勒一生累積340場勝績,蟬聯全泰拳擊、西洋拳7項冠軍,更進軍國際拳壇,迄今拳壇仍無人能出其右。李智仁深受其吸引,立即飛往泰國拜亞批勒為師。

在泰國培訓,每天早上5點起床跑步、練拳,一天下來將近10小時的激烈特訓,身體疲憊到快無法負擔。李智仁談到學拳:「最苦的是克服受傷的後遺症,像是脛骨會受傷,就是脛骨練得不夠硬,要加強訓練。」療傷後還要克服心理陰影加強訓練,這種苦只有自己能體會。

所幸有緬甸拳的基礎,李智仁得以縮短學程,很快就學成歸台,李智仁說:「我非常喜歡泰國,泰國風情又接近緬甸,所以我將泰國當作第三個故鄉,台灣是第二個。」

親身經驗台、泰學拳的差異

在泰國,泰拳十分普及大眾,甚至一個泰國家庭6個小孩,就會有2個自小生活在道館,以終身志業的方式培養,成人後再將比賽所得平分回饋給道場。

反觀台灣,因為泰拳未商業化,泰拳選手無法將其作為職業維持生計。所以,大部分的台灣人是抱著健康練習或體型雕塑的心態學習泰拳,練習模式跟泰國當然不同。

但是在台灣學泰拳有一大優勢,環境相對富裕,加上政府推行的全民健康保險,所有人民都享有平價醫療的權利,對於時常受傷的泰拳選手,有很大的醫療保障。學員黃于修在泰國拳賽曾看到選手受傷,當地醫生只給了一包便宜的綠色藥水,選手喝完馬上腹瀉排出體內瘀積的熱氣,雖然有效但成份不明,令人擔憂;相形之下,在台灣學泰拳「你沒有後顧之憂,只要有心練,還是可以變拳王。」李智仁說。

習武先習德──李教練的教學現場

台灣各拳館教授泰拳的風格和技術都各有千秋,有些會側重摔技,有些側重肘或膝,而仁李泰拳館則是著重於加強拳腳,李智仁說:「摔是泰拳的精髓,拳腳是泰拳的基本功。」因為腳步打穩,出拳才會紮實。且根據醫學理論,全身70%的肌肉在下半身,訓練泰拳步伐能加強大腿肌力,不僅有助於血液循環,也能培養泰拳需要的大量體力。

基礎工夫奠定後,李智仁會親自拿靶一對一教學。護身靶具的重量再加乘拳踢的力量,戴靶者需承受的攻擊力道相當大,一堂課二十多位學生練下來,受傷是常有的事,但李智仁知道,沒有一個學生的弱點是一樣的,親自戴靶才能因材施教。所以在李教練的教學現場,沒有固定教法,只有專屬每一位學員的叮囑。

仁李泰拳館的宗旨:「學藝先學禮,習武先習德」。不尊師重道或心存邪念的人,都曾被李智仁逐出師門。

好勇的人學習泰拳,反而會在基礎訓練的過程學到「降伏其心」。教練黃于修國中時期學過太極拳,自認為程度不差,一進泰拳館就好大喜戰,挑戰其他學員,結果卻一敗塗地,之前所習的技藝全部洗牌重練。黃于修學拳7年的體悟是「泰拳帶給我的是生活上的態度,我更懂得沉澱、思考,避戰但不懼戰。」

「教練教導我們要守倫理、孝順,學拳不可爭強鬥狠。」學員們都稱呼「邱哥」的邱訂助說。他笑稱自己是仁李最老的學生,跟隨李智仁學拳多年,他形容李教練不管是武術或待人處事各方面,都值得大家學習,因此桃李滿天下,職業含括法官、陸海空軍人、維安特勤和警察等。

學生積極參加國際泰拳賽事

「泰拳講求實用性,一定要實戰對打。」李智仁說,他從自身經驗深深理解到:閉門修煉無法提升拳技與心智,唯有參加正式比賽才能跳躍性的成長。李智仁常鼓勵學生參加國內外賽事,經歷過多次比賽的學生分享:「會更認識自己,越打越謙虛,因為知道自己懂很少。」侯怡君說。

侯怡君年僅28歲,看到她靈活的身手,很難想像剛進拳館的她體重高達85公斤,教練一句:「要不要去比賽?」讓她卯足全力一年多內瘦身至可參賽的57公斤,「我覺得比賽最苦的是減重,看別人狂吃,自己只能喝水。」侯怡君說。然而辛勞在上場後就被拋到腦後,尤其是在獲勝時,什麼都不苦了。

另一位仁李泰拳館的榮耀拳手羅啟榮,在2012年香港皇者拳霸賽打進決賽,與香港拳王陳啟迪爭奪亞洲拳王金腰帶。陳啟迪是世界業餘泰拳冠軍,技術和氣勢都勝過羅啟榮,「但是阿榮從頭打到尾,而且勢均力敵。」李智仁讚譽羅啟榮能在國際賽事奪下亞軍,實屬難得。

生活實踐泰拳精神:堅持

和泰拳相提並論的散打,其比賽規則採用三戰兩勝制,只要前兩回得勝,就不用進入第三回合;但泰拳不同,泰拳五回合以最後一局定勝負,儘管前四回合連敗,只要在第五回合奪勝就是贏家。賽制所呈現的正是泰拳精神──堅持,如李智仁常說的:「前後未分,終點為定。」

練習泰拳其實是在練習一個人的意志力,新進學員莊福仁表白:「訓練真的很痛苦,我光是拉筋就常常痛到哭。」莊福仁患有高血壓,為了健康而來學習泰拳,短短4個月內,病情得到控制,也經醫生許可調降高血壓藥量。痛苦的訓練都能堅持下來了,生活及工作上還有什麼過不去呢?

在台灣推廣泰拳至全球

隨著時代推移,推廣泰拳的方式也逐漸轉變,李智仁常受邀至健身房示範,或是到孤兒院跳泰拳戰舞、在大專院校擔任泰拳社團顧問等,讓更多人瞭解泰拳。

仁李泰拳館就像是個小熔爐,有日、法、西……等二十多國的拳手慕名來台拜師,甚至有沙烏地阿拉伯、北京等地方贊助商邀請李智仁去指導,但他都一一拒絕,「畢竟這邊屬於我們,我的家在台灣。」李智仁說。

李智仁認定台灣為最終的家鄉,泰拳教育是他生活的全部,每晚課程開始,學員汗水氣息漸漸覆蓋拳館空氣中的藥膏味,儘管昨日練習的傷痛依舊,李智仁仍用行動貫徹泰拳的精神──努力、堅持到底!

台湾のムエタイの父

文・郭玉平 写真・林旻萱 翻訳・山口 雪菜

「ムエタイ」と聞いてどんなスポーツをイメージするだろう。激しい格闘技として知られるが、高雄にある仁李泰拳館(ムエタイ・ジム)では、映画のように激しく殴り合う姿は見られず、高血圧を患う人も、一つの武術として毎日練習に通ってくる。

館長の李智仁はミャンマー華僑で、若い頃にミャンマーとタイで正統のムエタイを学んだ。世界的にムエタイブームが起きた頃、これを台湾に持ち込んだことから「台湾ムエタイの父」と呼ばれている。ムエタイを教えて17年、これまで多くの教え子を世に送り出してきた。その中には総統の警護員を務める人もいる。多くの弟子は国内外のムエタイやサンダの大会に積極的に出場し、広く活躍している。


台湾「仁李泰拳館」に足を踏み入れると、湿布薬の匂いがする。館長の李智仁は床に座り、教え子のために防具に釘を打って修理していた。午後の日差しが差し込む穏やかな雰囲気はムエタイのイメージとはかけ離れている。タイ伝統の格闘技であるムエタイはボクシングやサンダと違ってルールは少なく、拳や脚、膝、肘を使って攻撃するため、怪我や流血の確率は高く、凶暴な格闘技と呼ばれることが多い。

一般的な、リングで行なわれる試合では、選手はグローブをつけて安全性を高めており、60年代に世界に普及した。それでも台湾ではムエタイを知らない人が多いため、東南アジアの血を引く李智仁は、タイの拳法をボクシング試合に取り入れ、台湾におけるムエタイの始祖となった。

ムエタイの帝王Apidejに師事

李智仁はミャンマー華僑で、子供の頃にブルース・リーに憧れて10歳の時からミャンマーで中国のカンフーとビルマ拳法を学び始めた。

ムエタイを始めたのは実は台湾に移住してからのことだ。テレビのナショナル ジオグラフィック チャンエルを見てムエタイの帝王Apidej Sit-hurinを知ったのがきっかけだ。Apidejは340勝を重ね、タイでムエタイとボクシングの7冠王となり、世界に進出して今もその右に出る者はいない。李智仁はこの姿に魅了され、すぐにタイに行ってその門下に入った。

タイでの訓練は、毎朝5時の走り込みに始まり、一日10時間の厳しい練習が続き、身体が持たないほどだった。「一番苦しいのは怪我の後遺症の克服です。脛骨を負傷すれば、そこが弱いからということで、さらに負荷をかけるのです」と言う。恐怖心に打ち勝つためにも練習を重ね、その辛さは自分にしか分からないと言う。

幸い、ビルマ拳法の基礎があったため、ムエタイも早くマスターすることができた。「タイは大好きです。タイは私の第三の故郷。第二の故郷は台湾です」と言う。

台湾で教えるムエタイ

タイでは、ムエタイは暮らしに深く根付いており、家庭によっては子供が6人いれば2人は幼い頃からムエタイ・ジムで生活をする。ムエタイを一生の仕事として幼い頃から学び、成人すると試合での稼ぎの一部をジムに納める。

これに対して台湾では、プロのムエタイ選手として生活することは不可能で、多くの人は健康やシェイプアップのために学ぶため、練習方法もタイとは異なる。

だが、台湾はムエタイを学ぶには有利な点も多い。経済的に豊かな上に国民健康保険があり、誰でも少ない負担で医療が受けられるため、負傷が多いムエタイ選手もすぐに治療を受けられるのである。「こうした環境が整っているので、真剣に練習すればチャンピオンになれる可能性があります」と李智仁は言う。

武を学ぶには、まず徳を学べ

李智仁のジムでは脚を重視する。「脚こそムエタイの基礎」だからである。下半身が安定していればこそ、強いパンチが打ち出せる。医学的にも、全身の筋肉の7割りは下半身にあり、太腿の筋力を鍛えることによって血流が良くなり、訓練に必要な体力も保てるのである。

下半身の力がついたら、李智仁は一対一のミット打ちを行なう。一回のトレーニングで20人余りの生徒を相手にすれば怪我をすることもあるが、生徒一人ひとり欠点が違うので、自らミットを手に教えていく。従って、仁李泰拳館では、決まった教え方はなく、生徒それぞれに合わせた方法で教えていく。

李智仁のモットーは「芸を学ぶにはまず礼を、武を学ぶにはまず徳を学べ」というものだ。師を尊敬しない者や邪心のある者は、李智仁は門下に入れない。

攻撃的な人も、ムエタイの基礎を習う過程で「心の克服」を学ぶこととなる。コーチの黄于修は中学の時に太極拳を習っていたので、自分は強いはずだと思っていた。そこでムエタイ・ジムに入るとすぐに他の選手に挑戦したが、散々な負け方をしてしまい、ゼロからやり直すことになった。7年間ムエタイを学んできた今、「ムエタイで学んだのは生活の態度です。以前より落ち着いて思考するようになりました。戦いは恐れませんが、避けるようにしています」と言う。

「先生は私たちに倫理を守り、親孝行するよう教えてくれます」と話すのは「邱兄さん」と呼ばれる邱訂助だ。彼は、自分は李先生の一番古くからの教え子だと言い、李先生は武術だけでなく、人としてさまざまな面で尊敬できる人だと言う。だからこそ、門下生がたくさんいる。中には裁判官や軍人、要人の警護員や警察官もいる。

国際大会に積極的に参加

「ムエタイは実用性を重んじるので、実践が必要です」と李智仁は言う。一人で練習しているだけでは技術も知恵も伸びないため、李智仁は生徒たちに内外の試合に積極的に参加させている。何回も試合に出ている生徒は「より深く自分を知ることができます。自分に分かることは非常に少ないこと知り、謙虚になりました」と言う。

28歳の侯怡君(女性)は機敏に動き、ジムに入った頃は体重が85キロもあったとは想像できない。コーチから「試合に出ないか」と言われたことで必死に練習し、一年後には57キロまで減量した。「試合で一番苦しいのは減量です。人が好きなように食べているのを前に、自分は水しか飲めないのですから」と言う。だが、試合に勝利した時は、そんな苦労も消し飛んでしまう。

もう一人、仁李泰拳館の優秀な選手、羅啓栄は、2012年に香港で開かれたSupreme Fight Championshipで決勝まで進み、香港の王者・陳啓迪とアジアのゴールドベルトを争った。陳啓迪はムエタイの世界アマチュアチャンピオンで、技術も気迫も羅啓栄に勝っている。「それでも羅啓栄は最初から最後まで互角に渡り合いました」と、李智仁は羅啓栄の準優勝を称える。

ムエタイの精神を実践

ムエタイと同じように論じられることの多いサンダの試合は、3ラウンド制で2ラウンド先取した方が勝利するが、ムエタイは違う。ムエタイは5ラウンドで戦われ、最後の1ラウンドで勝敗が決まる。それまでの4ラウンドで連敗していても、第5ラウンドで勝った方が勝者となるのである。そこにはムエタイの「意志を貫く」という精神が現われている。「勝負は最後で決まるのです」と李智仁は言う。

最近入門した荘福仁は「練習はつらくて、私はストレッチだけで痛くて泣きそうになります」と言う。高血圧の彼は健康のためにムエタイを始めたところ、わずか4ヶ月で症状はコントロールでき、医者も降圧剤の量を減らしてくれたという。辛い練習にも耐えているのだから、仕事や生活で耐えられないことなどないと言う。

ムエタイを台湾から世界へ

時代が移り変わるに連れ、ムエタイ普及の方法も変わってきた。李智仁はしばしばスポーツジムに招かれて指導を行ない、孤児院などで試合前に行なう踊り「ワイクルー」を教え、また大学短大のムエタイ部の顧問も務めるなど、より多くの人がムエタイに触れるようになった。その名は世界にも知られており、日本やフランス、スペインなど20数ヶ国から教えを請いに来る人がいる。

李智仁は、台湾を終の棲家としており、ムエタイ指導はその暮らしのすべてである。毎晩、トレーニングが始まると、生徒たちの汗と熱気が湿布薬の匂いをかき消す。昨日のトレーニングの傷はまだ癒えていないが、李智仁はムエタイの精神で意志を貫いていく。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!