Spring in Grand Courtyard

The Renovation of a Historic Building
:::

2020 / March

Lee Shan Wei /photos courtesy of Lin Min-hsuan /tr. by Brandon Yen


Good things spring from altruistic deeds. Kuo Su-jen, chairwoman of both Rich Development Co. and the Kuo Mu Sheng Foundation, has devoted herself passionately to the renovation of old houses, in order to renew their faded splendor.

It was a new construction project that unexpectedly led Kuo to undertake the restoration of the former residence of Thomé H. Fang, late ­professor of philosophy at National Taiwan University. As if guided by a mysterious force, upon entering Grand Courtyard she stood in awe of the enigmatic old NTU staff residence. Her penetrating eyes saw exciting opportunities in the midst of dilapidation, and she wanted to give the derelict house, which is nearly a century old, a new lease of life.


From desolation to rebirth

The main building having been damaged by fire, the compound had yielded to weeds and exuded a dismal atmosphere. Ignoring the silent desolation, Kuo donned her safety helmet, and brushing aside the vegetation that choked the path, fearlessly explored the hidden recesses of the place.

“This is an ROT [rehabilitate‡operate‡transfer] project. The tendering process wasn’t all that smooth.” Grand Courtyard is situated in a quiet alley off Section 1 of Taipei City’s Heping East Road, occupying approximately 1.1 acres. The place was once shrouded in mystery. Trees such as towering Formosa sweetgums and verdant pines and banyans surround the main building: an edifice cover­ing 0.3 acres of ground and completed in 1931, when Taiwan was under Japanese rule. Designated a historic building by the Taipei City Government in 2012, Grand Courtyard had at first served as a guesthouse for Japanese naval officers before becoming a primary school for Japanese pupils. In 1952, when its ownership passed to National Taiwan University, Grand Courtyard was transformed into residential quarters for university staff.

From Kuo Su-jen’s taking on the project in 2015, the restoration took four and a half years, during which time Kuo, who subscribes to the principle that restorations should be faithful to the original, allowed no detail, however minute, to escape her supervision. “Because of their age, and because of the fire, the steel trusses had to be replaced.” The removed trusses have been preserved behind the building, offering visitors a glimpse of the past. “If we take a bird’s-eye view, we notice that the main building has a very expansive roof.” Kuo wished to do justice to the building’s original magnificence. She chose not to install a ceiling below the tallest part of the roof, in order to fully expose the wide spans of the roof structure.

“We have almost entirely reconstructed the building, from foundation to roof.” The floor, which was decaying, had sunk in many places. “With a public building, our prime concern is safety.” They left untouched the stone foundation blocks, strengthening them with reinforced concrete. With a view to durability, they opted for a terrazzo floor inlaid with brass strips, creating a plain and smooth visual effect across its wide expanse. The new ceramic roof tiles were also made and fired to look like the originals. “These tiles on the wall—they too were made to the original pattern.” Lining the upper parts of the arched windows are NTU’s iconic ribbed tiles—each with 13 grooves—which impart a pristine grace to the edifice.

Inside the glass-walled restaurant, the corridor leading to the VIP room retains its original arches; it feels like a time tunnel. Slide open the wooden door, and you are engulfed by the fragrance of Taiwan cypress, which pervades the entire space from floor to roof. “These glass panes with ripple patterns are hard to come by now.” The glass sliding doors on the wooden cupboards preserve the charm of half a century ago.

“All of these window frames are made of Taiwan cypress.” The builders at the time had already mastered the mechanism of Western-style sash windows; the window panes can be slid vertically to any height. “Nowadays it’s very difficult to find woodworkers who are skilled in traditional joinery techniques.” They did eventually enlist the services of old masters from Changhua and Chiayi, who slowly and carefully restored the windows by trad­itional means.    

“Without good reason, we will never remove what we’re able to keep.” The mottled look of the outer walls has been deliberately preserved, and green plants are encouraged to climb all over them. In the forecourt, the disused old well is now home to verdurous ferns that usually grow in woodland habitats. The rust-pitted ­anchor plates on the walls are still there, loyally guarding the old house. As for the covered walkway that connects the main building and the adjacent restaurant, all of the wooden canopy has been retained except for the decayed and damaged parts.

Grand Courtyard in full bloom

Looking in through the compound’s jet-black palisade gate, you glimpse a poetic landscape of interlacing shadows. A few steps into Grand Courtyard (opened on 7 October 2019 after its renovation) bring you to an eye-catching poster for an exhibition by the artist Leigh Wen, the first to be staged here. Kuo Su-jen says that the rooms inside the main building have been opened up and are available for exhibitions and other arts events.

“In 2012 a fire destroyed the roof of the building. This is where it started.” Kuo stands in front of Wen’s celebrated large-scale painting Fire, marveling at the way things have turned out. The orange flames in the painting, which covers most of one wall, look all too real, serving as a vivid memorial to the building’s history.

“This is an old work that won an award two decades ago from the New York Foundation for the Arts. We were pleased to find that it fitted the dimensions of the venue perfectly.” Wen is an internationally renowned Taiwanese artist based in the US. The first artist to exhibit at Grand Courtyard, she has painstakingly created many artworks that display dazzling colors and evoke a sense of grandeur. Together, the works bring resplendence to a place newly recovered from the ravages of fire.

In the hall are displayed Wen’s paintings of blooming flowers, which symbolize an auspicious future. Wen’s virtuosic style and distinctive sgraffito technique endow each of her finely painted blossoms with substance and life, and impart a velvety texture. Wen has been awarded two fellowships by the New York Foundation for the Arts and has won a prize in the Lorenzo il Magnifico awards at the Florence Biennale. She has been invited to exhibit at US embassies in various countries, and as a cultural ambassador for the US, has traveled to Africa to teach modern art.

Standing on the central line of the main building and looking to left or right, you see the consecutive rooms extending into the distance like a range of mountains. “I think her works have a grandeur that will command every­one’s attention in this place.” As a collector and now a close friend, Kuo, who is a connoisseur of colors, has long admired Wen’s large-scale, mineral-tinted works, which are both magnificent and finely detailed.

“My childhood and later career have much in common with those of Ms. Kuo.” As the eldest daughters in their respective families, both Kuo and Wen have benefitted from their fathers’ high expectations and worked hard to develop their professional careers.

A haunt for artists and thinkers

Grand Courtyard promises not only visual but also culinary delights. “We commissioned T. D. Lee, the famous Taiwanese architect, to design this glass-walled restaurant.” Lee’s masterful touch has produced a harmony between the new building and its environment: every corner inside is blessed with lovely views of the outside surroundings, while changes in the weather contribute to an ever-varying charm. “We serve afternoon teas and light meals here, as well as various full-course meals.” Believing in the viability of supplying high-quality but inexpensive goods, they hope more visitors will be attracted to Grand Courtyard, where they may linger at their leisure.   

Kuo’s husband, Liu Wen-liang, is chief executive officer at the Kuo Mu Sheng Foundation. Inspired by his father-in-law’s diligence, frugality and honesty, Liu puts these virtues into practice and cherishes everything he has.

“Here we’re planning to establish a museum of Thera­vada Buddhist art, where we may organize talks on Buddhism and other philosophical topics.” Kuo has accrued a rich cultural knowledge, and many of the beloved artworks in her collection will find a home here in this beautiful, rejuvenated place, where visitors will be able to appreciate them. Taipei City will also be graced with another new haunt for artists and thinkers.   

“It is people that give a sense of warmth to a building.” Kuo believes that there are invisible forces drawing together like-minded people who resonate with each other. Kuo and her husband Liu, who are both very neighborly, have encountered many former residents coming back to Grand Courtyard to renew their memories.

Despite having spent more than they will be able to recoup, and despite having the right to use the property for merely a limited period of time, Kuo thinks it is all worth the effort if it makes people happy. “I have a sense of mission and I want to breathe new life into every old house in order to recreate its past splendor.” Time flows quietly on, and patience will eventually be rewarded. Winter’s frosty wind is retreating into the distance, and spring with its warm breezes has stolen upon us.

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

繁體 日本語

大院子的春天

古蹟重生的傳奇

文‧李珊瑋 圖‧林旻萱

抱持一顆利他的心,所有的善緣自然就來了。身兼力麒建設事業群及郭木生基金會董事長的郭淑珍,用注入生命的熱情,全心投入老屋重建,再現昔日風華。由迪化街的「綻堂」與溥儀御醫黃子正故居改建的「綻堂蒔光」,到修復圓山緩坡上,大稻埕茶商陳朝駿故居「台北故事館」,每一座老房子都全然賦予新生命,展開切合氛圍的營生。

因為新建案而意外投入哲學大師方東美故居的古蹟修復,像是冥冥中有一股力量牽引,郭淑珍一踏入大院子,就被蒙上神秘面紗的台大公共宿舍群徹底震懾,欣喜地看出衰敗中的重重生機,決心讓近百年的頹圮老屋,涅盤重生。讓眾生再次在綠海波濤中自然呼吸,極盡享受懷舊復興的文青優雅。


由荒涼到復興

祝融洗禮後的大院子,荒煙蔓草,一片蕭颯。百年老榕樹雜亂的氣根,張牙舞爪的霸占著地盤,在細細碎碎的縫隙間,撒下白駒過隙的耀眼光芒。戴上工程帽的郭淑珍,無視主建物火吻後的寂靜衰敗,一路用手撥開小徑上盤根錯節的枝椏,無畏地向深處探索。沉積多年的落葉,厚厚實實地覆蓋住不明顯的走道,隨著踩下的瞬間,沙沙作響,在寧靜的大院子裡上下迴盪,彷彿輕聲述說著飄渺消逝的前塵滄桑。

「這是ROT的案子,開標過程有些曲折。」郭淑珍坐在側屋原址新建、潔淨寬敞的玻璃屋裡,憐惜的目光,卻注視著屋外的花花草草,叮嚀著員工澆水時,不要遺忘角落裡的每一個盆栽。「這些花草,都是由家裡庭院分株來的。」愛屋及烏的心,不言而喻。位於和平東路一段寧靜的巷弄內,基地面積達1,355坪的大院子,曾經蒙上一層神秘的面紗。參天的楓香,常年翠綠的松樹和榕樹,圍繞著1931年日據時期上梁,占地402坪的主建物。2012年台北市政府登錄為歷史建築的「大院子」,前身是日本海軍軍官招待所,後來做為日僑小學,1952年產權歸屬台灣大學,做為教職員宿舍。

從2015年接案開始,歷時四年半,秉持「修舊如舊」原則的郭淑珍,一磚一瓦的嚴格監工。「因為年代久遠,又經過火燒,所以鋼構桁架必須換掉。」拆卸後的原物,仍保留在屋後,供人緬懷憑弔。「由高處俯瞰,主屋的屋頂面積是很寬廣的。」郭淑珍想保持主建物氣度恢宏的原貌。「要找到這麼長的好木頭,真的是愈來愈難。」挑高的屋脊,故意不安裝天花板,讓跨距極大的梁柱架構完全裸露。「我們還保留貓道。」桁架下形似棧道的通道,未來可以方便維修人員行走檢驗。

「幾乎是由地基到屋頂,全面重建。」原本腐朽的地板,處處出現凹陷危機。「做為公共建築,安全是首要考量。」留下原本的石墩,再用鋼筋混凝土強化。為了延長使用年限,改用磨石子鑲嵌銅條的施作工法,保留純樸又平滑的視覺延展。屋瓦也完全依照原來的形式燒製,雖然一般人用肉眼無法察覺,但是龜毛的郭淑珍仍覺得色澤偏白。「就讓歲月來洗刷吧!」由內到外的牆面粉飾,也盡量做到原貌重現。「這些磚,也是依照原來的樣子重做的。」半圓形窗框上,具有台灣大學象徵性的13溝面磚,保留古樸的容顏。

玻璃屋裡,通往VIP室的走道,保留原貌的穹頂造形,彷彿走進時光隧道。推開木頭拉門,室內由地板到屋頂,滿室檜木的香氛,酥柔到讓人全身放鬆。「這些水波玻璃,現在很難看到。」木製櫥櫃上的玻璃拉門,散發著半世紀前的雲彩。「這些洗手台和馬桶都是兒童使用的尺寸。」見證歲月的泛黃水漬,在乾涸多年後,再次喜悅地汨汨流動。

「這些窗框都是檜木的。」郭淑珍愛憐地撫觸著木質細緻的窗櫺,仔細審視。在久遠的年代,已經能夠運用力學原理,讓每一扇上下推動的玻璃窗,都能隨意停置在任何高度。好不容易找到彰化和嘉義技術精良的榫卯工法師傅,精工慢活的用傳統工法復舊。不計成本地運用自家龐大的建築業資源,支援老屋重生,郭淑珍真的是得天獨厚。

「只要是能保留的,我們不會刻意拆除。」故意留下斑駁的外牆,讓綠色植栽恣意攀爬。前院廢棄的古井,竟讓原本生長在山林間的綠蕨青翠欲滴。保留鏽蝕的壁釘,讓它忠貞穩固地守護著老宅。連通主建物與側屋的木質廊道,只修整腐壞的部分。行進其間,憑欄凝思,引發思古的幽情。

花開富貴 大院子喜氣迎賓

穿透性的墨黑木柵門,掩不住疏影橫斜的詩意美景。走進2019年10月7日重生後開幕的「大院子」,迎面而來的是鄭麗雲亮橘耀眼的首展海報。「現在主建物的空間都是開放通透的,可以做展覽和藝文活動使用。」郭淑珍不只為老屋拉皮美容,更擅長運用無可取代的質樸風韻為藝文加分。      

「2012年,因為一場火,屋頂燒掉了,這裡就是起火點。」郭淑珍站在藝術家鄭麗雲《火》,龐然經典巨作前,驚嘆冥冥中的安排。矗立整面牆,橘紅色的熊熊火焰,彷彿正在燃燒,為古蹟的歷史做了最佳註腳。

「這是20年前在美國獲得紐約文藝聯盟創作獎章的舊作,但是沒有想到,居然和展場的尺寸恰巧相符。」享譽國際的旅美藝術家鄭麗雲應邀為「大院子」作的首展,纖細的雙手,創作出色澤斑斕又大器的多幅畫作,讓浴火重生後的「大院子」華麗生輝。

站在門廳,一幅幅盛開的花朵,迎來富貴吉祥。純熟的繪畫風格,獨特的刮線立體技法,讓每一朵盛開的花卉,栩栩如生地展現出絲絨般的細膩風采。曾獲美國紐約藝術基金會榮譽獎章、義大利佛羅倫斯雙年展米提其大獎的鄭麗雲,作品獲邀於世界各地的美國大使館展出,並任美國文化大使,前往非洲教授現代藝術。大膽又古典的創作,每每讓人驚豔。

站在主屋十字中軸線上,向兩側遙望,一進又一進的起伏空間感,像山脈般無限延伸。一側的底端是深深淺淺的綠,畫的是明池山莊。另一頭是波光粼粼的藍,彷彿聽得到海浪拍擊的聲響。「我覺得她的作品,具有鎮住全場的氣度。」由收藏家到親如姐妹,對色彩敏銳度極高的郭淑珍,十分鍾情於鄭麗雲用礦石特調,恢宏又細膩的巨作。「我爸爸是賣布起家的,從小我就喜歡站在店裡,看著排列在貨架上,色彩繽紛的各色布匹,挑選自己喜歡的布料,請母親為我做衣裳。」

「我和郭董的成長歷程有很多相似之處。」同樣身為長女,在嚴父的教誨下,對事業專注又勤奮。「數年前回來台灣,差點死掉。」蘇迪勒颱風將室內整片玻璃窗吹落,無情地刺傷睡在床上的鄭麗雲。輕撫著至今仍在復原中的上唇和脖子上的數道疤痕,仍然心有餘悸。「也因為這場風暴,讓我和郭董結為鄰居,成為契合的姐妹。」

流連忘返的文青沙龍

徜徉在大院子裡,不僅是視覺饗宴,更是美食天堂。「這座玻璃屋是委請台灣建築美學教父李天鐸建築師設計的。」大師級的眼光和手法,讓建物與整體空間無違的融合,室內每個角落都能借景增色,隨著陰晴風雨的轉換,各具風貌。傳承父親的果斷眼光和母親的圓融百納,郭淑珍有霸氣的一面,也有溫柔的慈祥。經常在餐廳人潮巔峰時,挽袖幫忙洗碗。「我們提供下午茶和簡餐,也供應多種正式套餐。」希望用物超所值,高貴不貴的經營理念,讓遊客留駐在「大院子」。

郭木生文教基金會執行長劉文良博士是郭淑珍的夫婿,敬仰岳父勤勉、儉樸、誠信的教誨,身體力行愛物惜物。「很多事都是機緣巧合。」蓊鬱的大樹下,具有巴里島風味的編織休閒椅,玻璃屋內極具質感的餐桌椅,是由一家歇業的餐廳轉手而來,與內外環境十分搭配。

「每次來『大院子』,都會有驚喜。」鄭麗雲欣喜地拿出手機四處捕捉。每一株花草忙不迭地發芽吐蕊,奔放舒展,奼紫嫣紅,相互爭艷。「這裡準備規劃為古南傳佛教藝術美術館,未來可以舉辦佛學、思想講座。」極具文化涵養的郭淑珍,心愛的諸多典藏,終於可以雍容見客,融入重生後的美景,也為台北市增添一處藝術沙龍佳境。

「因為人,讓建築物有了溫度。」郭淑珍深信無形的氣場,會凝聚磁波相同的人,產生頻率共振。敦親睦鄰的郭淑珍和劉文良在「大院子」遇到好多位昔日的住戶,特別重返回憶。「在這裡印證了睹物思情。」前Google台灣香港兩地的總經理張成秀,也曾經是「大院子」的住戶,帶著臥病多年的母親重返「大院子」,老人家興奮地睜開雙眼,泛著淚光四處張望。

雖然付出了難以回收的高昂費用,僅僅取得有年限的使用權,但是郭淑珍認為,只要能讓人幸福,就是值得的。「我覺得有一種使命感,要讓每一座老房子再現生機,重現昔日的風華。」時光靜靜流淌,等待終有盡頭。颯颯的寒風漸行漸遠,暖柔的春風,已悄悄地拂面。

大院子の春

歴史的建築物のリノベーション

文・李珊瑋 写真・林旻萱 翻訳・松本 幸子

他人のためにと心がけていると、あらゆる良縁が自ずと近づいてくるものだ。力麟建設グループと郭木生基金会の董事長を兼ねる郭淑珍は、古い建造物の再建に情熱を注いできた。迪化街にあるアートスペース「綻堂」や、溥儀の医師だった黄子正の旧宅を改造した「綻堂蒔光」、茶商として知られた陳朝駿の旧居を修復した「台北故事館」など、老朽化した建物に新たな命が与えられ、その建物にふさわしい営みが展開されている。

台湾大学哲学科教授だった方東美の旧宅修復も手掛けた郭淑珍だが、台湾大学の宿舎だった「大院子」に足を踏み入れた途端、その再建の可能性を見出し、喜びに打ち震えた。そして崩れかけた百歳近いこの建物を必ず蘇らせようと決心した。庭の木々に囲まれ、レトロでアートなひとときを人々に楽しんでもらおうと。


荒廃から復興へ

当初、火災を経た「大院子」は、焼け跡も生々しく、雑草やツルに覆われていた。樹齢百年のガジュマルが気根を枝のあちこちから伸ばしている。木漏れ日の漏れる隙間に過去の光景がちらつくような気がした。工事用ヘルメットをかぶった郭淑珍は、火災で焼けた本館は顧みず、手で枝や草を払いながら、どんどん奥へと進んだ。落ち葉が厚く積もり、通路も定かではない。枯葉を踏みしだく音が、まるでこの建物の経てきた物語をささやくかのようだった。

「これはROT(民間事業者が政府所有施設を改修し、管理‧運営する方式)プロジェクトで、落札の過程で少し手間取りました」と、別棟のあった場所に新築されたガラス張りの別館に座り、郭淑珍は当初を振り返る。だがその目は庭の草花にも注意深く注がれ、隅の鉢植えにも水やりを忘れないようスタッフに言いつけている。「これらの草花は我が家の庭から株を分けてきました」和平東路一段の静かな路地内にたたずむ「大院子」は、1355坪の広さながら、長く神秘のベールに覆われてきた。空高く伸びたフウの木、マツ、ガジュマルなどが、日本統治時代の1931年に建てられた402坪の本館を取り囲む。2012年に台北市「歴史建築」に指定された大院子は、日本の海軍士官接待宿泊所として建てられたのが、後に日本人小学校になり、1952年に台湾大学の所有となって教職員宿舎として用いられていた。

2015年にROTを請け負ってから4年半、郭淑珍は「元通りに」を原則に、細部にまで厳しく施工監督を行った。「古いうえに火災にも遭い、鉄骨の梁は取り換える必要がありました」解体した元の建材は建物の裏に置き、当時をしのぶ手掛かりとした。「高所から見ると本館の屋根の広いことがわかります」本館の持つ堂々としたたたずまいは残したかった。「こんなに長い木材を見つけるのは近年ますます難しくなりました」高い天井に天井板はつけず、長い梁の掛かる様子が見えるようにした。「猫の道も残したのですよ」屋根裏には猫が歩けるような棒が渡してあり、そこに上ればメンテナンスの足場ともなる。

「基礎から屋根までほぼ建て直しました」床板は腐っており、歩くのも危なかった。「公共建築として安全は第一です」礎石だけを残し、鉄筋コンクリートで強化した。耐性を持たせるために、床は人造大理石を銅線で枠取りした施工で、シンプルで滑らかな感じが出せた。屋根瓦は元の形通りに焼き直した。見ても違いはわからないが、細部にこだわる郭淑珍は白っぽくなってしまったとこぼす。壁面の装飾も室内外ともにできる限り復元した。「このタイルも元の通りに作ったのです」アーチ形の窓枠や、台湾大学の建物によく用いられているスクラッチタイルも再現させた。

別館のVIP室へ行く廊下は、元通りのアーチ形通路で、まるでタイムトンネルを抜けるような感じだ。木製の引き戸を開けると室内は床から天井までヒノキの香りに満ち、すがすがしい。「こうしたすりガラスは今では見かけません」戸棚のガラス戸が半世紀前の柔らかい光を放つ。「この手洗い場や便器は子供サイズです」長い年月乾ききっていた洗い場の水垢に再び水がほとばしる。

「窓枠はみなヒノキです」と、郭淑珍はいとおしげに窓枠をなでた。当時すでに上げ下げ窓の技術が用いられており、窓をどの高さに開けても固定できる。この窓のために、ほぞ継ぎのできる職人を彰化と嘉義から見つけてきた。予算にはこだわらず、家業の建築業を生かして建物を再建させる腕は、郭淑珍に並ぶ者はいないだろう。

「残せるものは、わざわざ取り壊したりはしません」まだらになった外壁もそのまま残して植物のツルをはわせ、長く使われなかった古井戸で庭の草木を潤す。本館と別館をつなぐ渡り廊下も朽ちていた部分だけを修築した。思わず足を止めて往時をしのびたくなる風情だ。

色鮮やかな花で歓迎

外からでも門の黒い柵を通して邸内の様子が垣間見える。2019年10月7日に新たに開幕した「大院子」に入ると、すぐ正面にアーティスト鄭麗雲の展覧会のポスターがあった。「現在、本館の部屋はすべて開放し、展覧会や芸術文化活動のスペースにしています」建物の再建だけでなく、そこに芸術文化の味を加えるのもお手の物だ。

「2012年の火事で屋根が焼けてしまいました。ここが出火場所です」と言う郭淑珍が立つ後ろに、まさに鄭麗雲の大きな絵画『火』が掛かる。壁一面にオレンジ色の炎が激しく舞い上がる絵で、この建物の歴史を説明するかのようだ。

「これは、20年前にニューヨーク芸術財団から賞をもらった旧作ですが、思いがけずこの展示スペースにぴったりのサイズでした」と、米国在住の国際的アーティスト、鄭麗雲は言う。招きを受けて「大院子」で初の展覧会となったが、そのたおやかな手から生み出されるダイナミックで鮮やかな作品は、災禍からよみがえった「大院子」にふさわしい輝きをもたらしている。

エントランスホールには一輪の花の絵が並び、華やかでおめでたい印象だ。独特の線で細かく立体的に描かれ、まるでベルベットの花が開いたかに見える。ニューヨーク芸術財団やフローレンス‧ビエンナーレでの受賞歴を持つ鄭麗雲の作品は世界各地の米国大使館に展示され、自身も米国文化大使としてアフリカに赴いたりしている。

本館内の構造は十字に交差しており、中央で両側に目をやれば奥へと展示室が連なるのが見渡せる。一方の一番奥には緑のグラデーションが見える。描かれているのは明池山荘だ。もう一方には潮騒の響くような青い波が見える。「彼女の作品は、場を押し鎮めるような迫力があると思います」色彩に鋭敏な郭淑珍は、岩絵の具を用いた鄭の作品を一目見て気に入り、作品を集め始め、今では鄭とは姉妹のように親しい。「父が布屋だったので、幼い頃から店に並んだ布のさまざまな色彩を見るのが好きでした」と郭は言う。

「郭董事長とは育った環境が似ています」どちらも長女で父親に厳しくしつけられ、仕事に打ち込む。「数年前に帰国した際にはあやうく死ぬところでした」台風でガラスが割れ、ベッドに寝ていた鄭に飛んできたという。まだ治りきっていない唇と首のいくつかの傷を見せてくれた。「でもこの台風のおかげで郭董事長のご近所となり、仲良くなったのです」

居心地の良い文化芸術サロン

大院子は、視覚的饗宴を楽しむだけでなく、グルメの場でもある。「このガラス張りの別館は、台湾建築美学の師と言われる李天鐸氏による設計です」建物が全体の空間に溶け込んでいる。外の風景が借景となり、天気の移り変わりも趣を添える。郭淑珍は父親の果断さと母親の包容力を受け継いだようだ。剛毅な一面もあれば、人の良い優しさも見せる。食事時でレストランが立て込んでくると腕まくりして皿洗いも手伝う。「軽食やスイーツ、お食事のセットも各種用意しています」良いものを安くのモットーで、ゆったりと大院子を楽しんでもらえればと考える。

郭木生文教基金会の事務局長を務める劉文良博士は郭淑珍の夫だ。勤勉で誠実、倹約であれという岳父の教訓をいつも実行してきた。「良い偶然が重なって今があります」大樹の木陰に置いたバリ島風の籐椅子や、レストランに並ぶ質感ある椅子やテーブルは、閉店した飲食店が使っていたものだが、ここのムードにうまく馴染んでいる。

季節ごとに次々と草花が芽を出し、花を咲かせる。「大院子に来るたびに、うれしい驚きがあります」と、鄭麗雲はスマホを手にあちこちを撮影している。「ここを上座部仏教芸術の美術館にする計画を進行中で、将来はここで仏教学や思想の講座が開けます」文化を愛でる郭淑珍の所蔵品を、ついに人々に披露できるのだ。台北市にまた一つ、優れた芸術サロンが生まれるだろう。

「人こそが、建物に温度を加えます」郭淑珍は、同じ磁波の人が集まれば共鳴を生む「気の場」という現象を信じる。ご近所を大切にする郭淑珍と劉文良だが、ここではかつての住人に多く出会った。昔を懐かしんで訪れてくれるのだ。Google台湾香港の総経理である張成秀もその一人で、病に長く臥せる母親を連れてきた。母親は目を大きく見開いて涙を浮かべ、邸内を見渡していたという。

元の取れない費用をかけ、しかも限られた期間の使用権があるだけだが、幸せを感じてくれる人がいればやりがいがあると郭淑珍は考える。「あらゆる古い建物を再生させ、華やかだった姿を取り戻してあげたいという使命感のようなものを感じます」時は静かに流れ、待つものはいつか訪れる。吹きすさぶ寒風もいつのまにか春風となり、顔を撫でていく。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!