The Taste of Home: —Savor a Spoonful of Southeast Asian Spices

:::

2017 / September

Cathy Teng /photos courtesy of Lin Min-hsuan /tr. by Bruce Humes


Over the past decade or so, names of exotic spices such as Thai holy basil, turmeric, tamarind and lemongrass have begun to pop up in Taiwan’s culinary lingo. These aromatic plants are the oft-yearned-for homeland flavors of Southeast Asian people who have come to live and settle in Taiwan. They not only enrich our food culture, they also represent an intriguing medium through which to acquaint ourselves with mainland and maritime Southeast Asia.


 

From July to October, the National Taiwan Museum is hosting a special exhibition, “The Taste of Hometown: Southeast Asian Flavors.” Through common plants and spices of Southeast Asia, it introduces the unique origins of spices—and tales of immigrants—from countries throughout the region. Thus visitors are not only given a chance to savor a street full of Southeast Asian delicacies and learn to recognize the hot and tart flavors that may be combined within a single mouthful, they are also able to experience a taste of immigrants’ nostalgia for their homelands.

Flavors of home

“People familiar with Taiwan’s history know that it has always been a multicultural place, and our diverse diet demonstrates this. Since 1992, with the influx of people from Southeast Asia, cuisine with a Southeast Asian flavor has also set foot in Taiwan and become a part of our food culture,” says the director of the National Taiwan Museum, Hung Shih-yu. So the museum, which focuses on cultural diversity and has long followed issues ­surrounding immigrants, this year organized its Taste of Hometown exhibition. 

On its opening day, July 22, following docent Chen Hsin-chun around the exhibition we quickly understood that climate and environment determine how spices are employed in Southeast Asia. The peoples of mainland Southeast Asia generally add fresh spices directly to their dishes, while island residents, due to less abundant natural resources, tend to dry fruits and seeds, grind them, and mix them to serve as a preserved seasoning base. 

As Chen conducted the tour, he didn’t neglect to correct some mistaken impressions about Southeast-Asian cuisine. For instance, the Chinese term da­pao used in the context of Thai cooking refers to holy basil leaves, and not the action of “hurling” something, as the characters used to write the word suggest; and “curry” signifies “mixed seasonings,” and thus the recipe for curry in each household in Southeast Asia is unique to that family.

Varied, complex Southeast Asian flavors

“For this exhibition, we interviewed immigrants from four countries, and presented spices and dishes from seven countries in Southeast Asia,” says curator Emily Hsu-wen Yuan.

There are many kinds of Southeast Asian spices, and this results in a rich, multi-layered cuisine. On display are ten containers of spices including pepper, cloves, tamarind, cinnamon, coriander seeds, cardamom, cumin and candlenuts. “And those are just the basics!” she says.

Yuan emphasizes that a more authoritative list would also have to include the herbal plants displayed on the walls, such as mint, lemongrass, Vietnamese coriander, pandan leaves, makrut lime, sawtooth coriander, turmeric, and Thai holy basil leaves.

At times the information she gathered about the region’s aromatic plants approached explosive proportions. Prior to conducting interviews, Yuan prepared background materials on ten plants per country, and notified her interviewees of the content of their talk. But some enthusiastic respondents added another 30. “We actually use this many spices back home,” they said, leaving her almost overwhelmed. 

Ester Kartika Condro, who is from Indonesia, brought sand ginger, her favorite, to the interview. When peeled it is white, and if you taste it, it is not as hot as Taiwan ginger, which can make you choke, but it does possess a refreshing mint oil fragrance. Sand ginger is not only edible, she said, it also has medicinal properties. Her mother grinds it into a paste that she applies to the abdomen to reduce flatulence. Feng Chun-yan, from Myan­mar, revealed that her father adores lemongrass. After boiling it to make soup he likes to chew on it, and can’t bring himself to just throw it away.

The exhibition doesn’t just bring to light little-known usages for seasonings; nostalgia for the immigrants’ homelands is also revealed. “When they recount their memories about spices, their eyes often turn red, or they seem to revert to their teenage years, as if they were young girls again at their mother’s side,” describes Yuan. She admires the courage that brought these female immigrants to Taiwan on their own, and their strength and perseverance in facing the challenges of their new lives.

The enthusiastic women immigrants often went on at length, describing the delicious flavors of their hometown dishes. “During the interviews, when I didn’t feel like I was starving, then I was so moved I thought I’d cry my eyes dry,” says Yuan.

Cross-cultural dialogue

“Crossing cultures is an intriguing but complex affair,” says Yuan, and it leads you to reflection on blind spots in your own culture. For instance, the Taiwanese use rice wine to remove a fishy smell, but ingesting alcohol is forbidden in Islam, so Muslims accomplish this by grinding turmeric into a mash, adding spices and then rubbing the mixture on the fish. In Taiwan, water spinach is cut into short lengths and stir-fried with garlic, but in Vietnam, the raw leaves of water spinach are picked off the stem, sliced into strips and served as an appetizer similar to salad. Many of these innumerable differences in approach were revealed in the course of the interviews for the exhibition.

The most memorable differences are in how spices are handled. The Taiwanese like to sauté using spring onions, ginger and garlic, which are often crushed or chopped and then tossed into the wok. But in Southeast Asia, virtually every family owns a mortar and pestle for pounding spices. Spices are crushed and ground manually and then added to dishes.

The question, “Can’t you use a juicer to do that?” eli­cits an expression of disbelief from Southeast Asians. “You won’t get the same effect,” they reply in concert. You must pound and mash them by hand, otherwise it’s not the real McCoy.

Leaving the museum behind

Beyond the exhibition, on weekends the museum also arranges guided tours, led by immigrants, of the Burmese, Indonesian and Filipino quarters of Greater Tai­­pei, where the guides can tell their own stories. Back at the museum, tours of the exhibition are also given by immigrant “ambassadors” at various times on weekdays. Dressed in the traditional garb of their homeland, they provide explanations based on first-hand knowledge.

“After the exhibition closes in Tai­pei, it will tour all over Taiwan in order to enrich the cultural resources of remote areas and outlying islands, and ensure that more locals can experience and better understand the cultures of Southeast Asia,” says Hung Shih-yu.

Spices originated in ancient India and spread throughout Southeast Asia. As they did, they were adapted to the conditions and customs of each country, creating the brilliant and diverse cuisines of mainland and maritime Southeast Asia. Later, these seasonings were brought to Taiwan by the women immigrants who have settled here, helping to assuage their nostalgia for their homelands, while adding new flavors to Taiwan’s spice palette. 

These women who crossed the seas for a new life here have gradually integrated themselves into Taiwan culture, and become indispensable members of society. The people of Taiwan should also endeavor to learn about and befriend these Southeast Asian newcomers, and appreciate the wonderful cultures and diversity they bring with them.

Because once you take root, you are family.            

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

繁體 日本語

「南洋味‧家鄉味」特展 品一杓酸甜苦辣

文‧鄧慧純 圖‧林旻萱 翻譯‧Bruce Humes

近十多年來,台灣日常的飲食字彙出現如「打拋」、「薑黃」、「羅望子」、「香茅」等帶著異國風情的香料名稱。這些香草植物是來台生活、定居的東南亞朋友們朝思暮想的家鄉味,它不僅勾起了東南亞友人的味覺記憶,也豐富了台灣的飲食文化,更成為台灣認識東南亞的有趣途徑。

 


2017年7月,國立臺灣博物館(簡稱「臺博館」)策劃了「南洋味‧家鄉味」特展,從東南亞常見的植物與香料運用切入,介紹東南亞各國香料的源起、各地香料特色及如何入菜,還有新住民們移居台灣的故事,讓民眾在品味街頭林立的東南亞美食料理時,能分辨這一口裡蘊含的酸辣滋味,也體會每一位移人思鄉的心情。

南洋味‧家鄉味

「熟悉台灣歷史的人都知道,台灣一直是一個多元文化的載體,從飲食的多元就可佐證,台灣的美食文化結合各族群的料理精髓;1992年起,隨著東南亞朋友入台工作、定居,帶有南洋風味的料理也進到台灣,成為台灣飲食文化的一部分。」談到此次特展的緣由,臺博館館長洪世佑說。

身為關注文化多樣性的臺博館,早在2014年策劃的「伊斯蘭:文化與生活特展」,就已頗受好評;2015年推出由新住民服務大使以母語為東南亞民眾進行博物館導覽的服務,更是台灣博物館界的先行者;今年則接續企劃「南洋味‧家鄉味」特展。

7月22日「南洋味‧家鄉味」特展開展,當天,臺博館南門園區會場,許多東南亞的朋友都穿著自己國家的傳統服飾來共襄盛舉,展示母國的繽紛美麗,還製作了多樣道地東南亞美食,色彩鮮艷地讓人垂涎欲滴。

步入展間,首先入目的是幅員廣大的東南亞地圖。東南亞在人類學上大致區分成「半島東南亞」和「島嶼東南亞」兩區塊。「半島東南亞」指的是越南、寮國、柬埔寨、泰國、緬甸等5國。「島嶼東南亞」則指散佈在南太平洋、印度洋中的兩萬多座島嶼,涵蓋印尼、菲律賓、馬來西亞、新加坡、汶萊、東帝汶等6國。

跟著臺博館導覽員陳信鈞走一圈展場,才知道氣候、環境決定東南亞各區使用香料的方式,如半島東南亞多數使用新鮮香料入菜,而島嶼東南亞因物產不豐盛,因此多將植物果實、種子等部分乾燥後磨碎,混合成醃製食物的基底。

陳信鈞一邊導覽,還不忘修正民眾對東南亞料理的錯誤想像,像泰國料理中的「打拋」,指的是打拋葉,而非打拋的動作;「咖哩」是混合香料的意思,在東南亞每一個家庭特調的咖哩風味都不同;「月亮蝦餅」是台灣自創的菜色等等觀念。

多元、複雜 東南亞味

「為了這次特展,我們訪談4個國家的新住民,在展場中呈現東南亞7個國家的香料與料理。」策展人袁緒文說。

東南亞香料種類繁多,造就料理的豐富層次。展場中展示了胡椒、丁香、羅望子、肉桂、芫荽子、綠豆蔻、孜然、石栗……等10個香料罐,「這10個罐子只是基本款呦!」策展人袁緒文強調,還要加上展示牆上薄荷、香茅、叻沙葉、香蘭葉、馬蜂橙、刺芫荽、薑黃、打拋葉等香草植物才算正統。

香料植物資訊量多到爆炸,袁緒文常常訪談前準備了該國10種香草植物的資料,事先通知受訪者下回訪談的內容,但熱心的受訪者會再幫她添上30種,並補充說:「我們那邊實際使用的還有這麼多香料」,讓她差點招架不住。

策展過程也儼如一堂植物學課,常常分別訪談了數個國家,才發現姊妹們說的是同一種植物,但各國名稱不同,料理使用的方式也不同,最終決定採用拉丁學名,再標示各國名稱。

來自印尼的廖轉運帶了她喜歡的沙薑,與台灣常見的老薑、嫩薑不同,沙薑剝開來是白色,嚐一口,嗆辣不如台灣的老薑,但有一股薄荷精油的清新。廖轉運說,沙薑不只當作料理,也可藥用,媽媽會磨成泥敷在肚子上消脹氣。緬甸來的馮春燕分享父親超級喜愛香茅,熬煮成湯後,還把香茅梗再三咀嚼,不捨丟棄。

被挖掘出來的不只是香料的應用,還有新住民的鄉愁。「她們常常聊著香料的回憶,就紅了眼眶,或彷如變身當年那個十幾歲、還跟在媽媽身邊的小女生,小時候一放學,書包一脫,就開始幫媽媽搗香料。」袁緒文生動地描述。讓人更欽佩新住民姊妹當年隻身來台的勇氣,也不捨她們為生活撐起的強悍與毅力。

熱情的姊妹也常滔滔不絕地描述著家鄉料理的美味,讓袁緒文說:「訪談的過程,不是聽到餓死,就是感動到哭死。」

跨文化對話

「跨文化是很有趣,又很複雜的事情。」袁緒文說,可以不斷反思自身文化的盲點,如台灣習慣以米酒去腥,但穆斯林因為宗教禁忌不能飲酒,她們的處理方式是用薑黃磨成泥,再搭配香料抹在魚上。台灣的烏骨雞是進補用的,印尼的烏骨雞是拿來作法的。台灣的空心菜多是切段,再用蒜頭爆炒,越南是將空心菜摘了葉子,用空心菜剖刀刨將莖梗刨成如一絲絲,做沙拉涼拌。這些差異不勝枚舉,都在訪談中被挖掘出來。

讓人印象最深刻的是香料的處理手法。台灣也愛用蔥、薑、蒜爆香,但多拍碎或切碎後入鍋;但東南亞各國幾乎家家戶戶都有研磨香料用的磨缽及石臼,香料經過手工的舂搗、研磨後才入菜。「不能用果汁機處理嗎?」只見馮春燕和廖轉運不以為然的表情,異口同聲的說:「效果不一樣」。一定要親手舂搗、研磨,否則不道地,這也開了我們的眼界。

走出博物館

體驗一場香料巡禮後,在南門園區小白宮外,館方用心地在苗圃種植了數種東南亞香草植物,如叻沙葉、刺芫荽、七葉蘭、馬蜂橙、帝皇烏藍、香茅等,讓民眾看完展可親身湊近觀察香草的特徵與特有香氣。

臺博館還在周末安排東南亞小旅行,由新住民朋友導覽台北周遭的緬甸街、印尼街、菲律賓街,讓她們說自己的故事。新住民服務大使的導覽也在周間不定期舉辦,她們將穿著母國傳統服飾,在展場內提供來自東南亞第一手的解說。

「『南洋味‧家鄉味』特展在臺博館撤展後,還要到全國去巡展,補足偏鄉、離島地區的文化資源,讓更多人體驗了解東南亞文化。」洪世佑說。

香料從印度發源,傳播到東南亞,適應了東南亞各國的風土民情,成就東南亞料理的精采多元。其後,香料又隨著新住民移住台灣,在居家的陽台、社區的菜園落腳,化解姊妹們的鄉愁,也為台灣的酸甜苦辣再添一味。

飄洋過海的新住民姊妹,已日漸融入台灣文化,培育了新二代,成為台灣不可或缺的一份子。我們更應多認識親近這來自東南亞的友人,了解他們帶來的精彩文化與豐富多元。

因為,落地生根,就是家人。                         

国立台湾博物館「南洋味・家郷味」特別展 ――スパイスと移住の物語

文・鄧慧純  写真・鄧慧純  翻訳・山口雪菜

この十年、台湾の日常の食生活に、ガパオ、ターメリック、タマリンド、レモングラスといったエスニックなスパイス名が見られるようになった。これらは台湾に暮らす東南アジア出身者にとって懐かしい故郷の味であるとともに、台湾の食文化を豊かにしてくれ、また私たちが東南アジアに触れる媒介の役割も果たしている。


2017年7月、国立台湾博物館は「南洋味・家郷味」特別展を開催した。東南アジアでよく見られるハーブやスパイスを切り口に、東南アジア各国の香辛料の起源やその特色、主な調理例、さらに東南アジア出身の新住民(結婚のために台湾へ移住してきた人々)の物語も紹介する。これらを通して、東南アジアの料理を食べる時、そこに故郷を想う人々の気持ちをうかがうことができる。

南洋の味、故郷の味

「台湾は常に多様な文化を受け入れてきました。食文化も同じで、台湾の食はさまざまなエスニックの料理の精髄を融合しています。1992年から、東南アジアの人々が仕事や結婚で台湾に移住してくるようになり、それとともに同地域の味覚も持ち込まれ、それが台湾の食文化の一部となったのです」と、国立台湾博物館の洪世佑館長は展覧会の背景を説明する。

こうして文化の多様性と新住民に関心を注ぐ同博物館では、今年は「南洋味・家郷味」特別展を開催することとなった。

7月22日、特別展の初日、博物館の南門会場には東南アジア出身の人々がそれぞれのお国の伝統衣装を身につけて集まった。母国の美を披露し、さまざまな料理を作ってふるまった。

会場に入ると、まず目に入るのは東南アジアの巨大な地図である。東南アジアは人類学上、大陸部と島嶼部に分けられる。大陸部に属するのはベトナム、ラオス、カンボジア、タイ、ミャンマーの5カ国で、島嶼に属するのはインドネシア、フィリピン、マレーシア、シンガポール、ブルネイ、東ティモールの6ヶ国である。

博物館のガイド陳信鈞について会場を一回りすると、気候や環境によってスパイスの使用方法が異なることが分かる。大陸部では新鮮な香辛料を多く用い、島嶼部は農産物が豊かではないため果実や種子を乾燥させて砕き、漬物などの風味付けに使うことが多い。

陳信鈞は、会場を案内しながら、東南アジア料理に対する一般の人々の誤解を指摘する。例えば、タイ料理に用いる「ガパオ」(中国語では「打拋」と書く)はガパオという植物の葉を指すのであって、「打って投げる」という意味ではないこと。また、カレーはスパイスを調合するという意味で、各家庭によってカレーの風味が異なることなどだ。

多様で複雑な東南アジアの味

「今回の特別展のために、私たちは4つの国から来た新住民を訪ねて話を聞き、会場では7ヶ国のスパイスや料理を紹介しています」とキュレーターの袁緒文は言う。

東南アジアの香辛料の種類は多く、それが料理の風味を豊かなものにしている。会場では、それぞれ缶に入った胡椒、クローブ、タマリンド、シナモン、コリアンダーシード、カルダモン、クミンシード、キャンドルナッツなど10種のスパイスが並んでいる。だが、これらは最も基本のスパイスに過ぎないと袁緒文は言う。この他にも通常、ミント、レモングラス、パンダンリーフ、コブミカン、ノコギリコリアンダー、ターメリック、ガパオなどを用いる。

スパイスやハーブの情報はあまりにも多く、袁緒文は東南アジア各国出身者を訪ねる前に、それぞれの国のスパイス10種の資料を集めたが、話を聞きに行くと、さらに30種類も加えられた上、「もっといろいろあるんですよ」と言われ、もうお手上げ状態だったと言う。

数ヶ国の出身者がそれぞれ挙げる植物は、国によって名前は違っても実は同じものであることも多く、展示ではラテン語の学名を採用し、それに各国の名称を併記することにした。

インドネシア出身の廖転運はショウガの仲間のサンド・ジンジャーが好きだと言う。台湾で料理に使うショウガとは違い、切ると中は白く、かすかにミントのような香りがする。廖転運によると、サンド・ジンジャーは料理に使うだけでなく、薬用もでき、食べ過ぎの時などはすりおろして腹部に塗るといいと言う。ミャンマー出身の馮春燕の父親は、スープに入れたレモングラスを口に含んでいつまでも噛んでいるそうだ。

こうした話からは、彼女たちの故郷への深い思いも伝わってくる。「彼女たちは、スパイスの思い出を語るうちに涙をにじませたり、幼い頃、母親のそばでスパイスをつぶす手伝いをしていたことなどを思い出すようでした」と袁緒文は言う。一人で台湾に嫁いできた彼女たちの苦労と勇気には心を動かされる。

異文化との対話

「異文化との対話はおもしろいもので、また非常に複雑でもあります」と袁緒文は言う。こうした対話においては、常に自身の文化の盲点に気付かされる。例えば、台湾では米酒で食材の臭みを消すが、飲酒を禁ずるイスラム教徒はターメリックをすり潰して他のスパイスとともに魚に塗って臭みを取る。台湾では空心菜は適当な長さに切ってニンニクと一緒に炒めて食べるが、ベトナムでは空心菜の葉を取り、包丁で茎を細長く切ってサラダにする。こうした思いがけない相違が次々と出てくるのである。

最も印象的なのはスパイスの処理方法である。台湾ではネギ、ショウガ、ニンニクの香りを活かす際、みじん切りや薄切りにして油で炒めるが、東南アジアの国々では、どの家にもすり鉢や石臼があり、すり潰したり、砕いたりして使う。ミキサーではダメなのかと問うと、馮春燕も廖転運も「それでは効果が違う」と口をそろえるのである。手作業ですり潰さなければ、本格的な味にならないのだという。

博物館の外へ

博物館内の展示のほかに、国立台湾博物館では週末に「リトル東南アジアの旅」も催している。新住民がガイドになり、台北周辺のミャンマータウン、インドネシアタウン、フィリピンタウンなどを案内しながら、自分たちの物語を話してくれる。新住民サービス大使による案内は平日も不定期に行なわれ、母国の衣装を身にまとった彼女たちが、館内で実体験に基づいた開設をしてくれるのである。

「『南洋味・家郷味』特別展は国立台湾博物館で開催された後、全国を巡回し、僻遠地域や離島などの文化的リソースの不足を補いつつ、より多くの人に東南アジア文化を知ってもらう予定です」と洪世佑館長は言う。

インドを発祥地とするスパイスは東南アジア各地へと広まり、それぞれの風土に適応しつつ東南アジア料理を豊かなものにしてきた。その後、東南アジアからの移住者とともに台湾へ渡ってきたスパイスは、各家庭のベランダなどで栽培され、彼女たちの郷愁を癒してきたのである。

海を渡ってきた新住民女性たちは、すでに台湾文化にとけ込んで第二世代を生み育て、台湾社会にとって欠かせない重要な存在となっている。だからこそ私たちは、身近に暮らす東南アジア出身の人々とその素晴らしい文化をより深く理解しなければならない。

ここに根を下ろして暮らす人々は、みな私たちの家族なのだから。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!