Scientific Illustrators

Exploring Nature’s Diversity Through Pictures
:::

2018 / August

Cathy Teng /photos courtesy of Chuang Kung-ju /tr. by Robert Green


Scientific illustration arose in a time before the invention of the camera and allowed scientists to capture the distinctive characteristics of plant and animal species. Armed only with keen powers of observation and an artist’s simple tools, illustrators rendered lifelike images of botanical and zoological specimens. Scientific illustration developed into a unique art form and introduced viewers to the diversity of the natural world.

 


 

The special exhibition on scientific illustration at the National Museum of Natural Science (NMNS) in Taichung has attracted a lot of attention. In a brightly lit space enclosed behind a glass partition there are many biological specimens on display, as well as an art table on which are the palettes, paints, brushes, and microscope used by illustrators. On the day of our visit, we could also watch as illustrator Peng Hsuan Yu took up her brushes to paint the legs of a longhorn crazy ant in watercolors. Some mesmerized visitors watched with faces glued to the glass, and Peng also interacted with visitors with the help of a microphone.

Scientific inquiry on display

This spectacle is part of the exhibition, and Peng jokingly describes herself as a “living permanent exhibit.” The idea of publicly displaying the behind-the-scenes work of scientific research was the brainchild of Lau Tak-cheung, an associate curator in the museum’s Science Education Department. A long-time advocate of science education, he explains that he drew inspiration from the film industry, where fans love to catch a look at the magic behind the scenes, and he decided to give museum visitors a similar insight into the process and rationale of scientific research. The scientific illustration exhibit has become one of the museum’s most popular. 

For the last 12 years, the museum has offered scientific illustration seminars and competitions. The seminars allow the public to try their hand at the art and are intended to arouse interest in the sciences.

Many phenomena in the natural world are invisible to the naked eye, or a verbal description would be too abstract and cumbersome. Often images can communicate more effectively. “Scientific illustration allows for the transmission of scientific information through images alone,” Lau explains.

In fact, communication is the essence of scientific illustration. It is an inclusive term covering a wide variety of artistic techniques, from the realistic images found in field guides to the stipple drawings seen in scientific journals. Even cartoon-style illustrations can be considered scientific illustrations.

Infographics, widely used today, are also a form of scientific illustration, Lau says. Numerical data are an important part of scientific findings. The challenge is to present those dry statistics through appealing visuals.

Observation is key

The first step in scientific illustration is observation, seeing the true nature of things and then depicting them systematically.

Peng Hsuan Yu’s first assignment as a scientific illustrator was to depict cetaceans—aquatic mammals such as whales and dolphins. She rendered them as rotund animals with full bodies, as she perceived them. But researchers pointed out that her images failed to capture the true shape of the sea creatures. At first she thought the researchers were nitpicking, but her ideas changed with more practice. She realized that the most important factor was accuracy. Careful observation changed her perspective, and love of her work has grown with practice. “Fashion designers love the peacock’s splendor, but few realize the amazing beauty of the colors of a fly,” she says with wonder after having studied flies under a microscope. 

Chen Yi-ming, who works for the Forest Protection Division of the Taiwan Forestry Research Institute, is a pioneer of scientific illustration in Taiwan. He has been engaged in ecological surveys for many years and has considerable field experience. We visited him at the Taipei Botanical Garden, and he gave us a first-hand look at the observation techniques of an illustrator. With a pencil in one hand and a sketchbook in the other, he rapidly sketched the distinctive traits of the head of a bird strolling at a leisurely pace in the park. He then observed the bird’s gait through binoculars and made a quick sketch of its body shape in another corner of the page. Chen explains that in the wild an illustrator must work rapidly, but the appearance and posture of the subject can be captured through quick sketches, providing a reference for later producing detailed illustrations. 

Li Cheng-lin illustrated some 650 bird species for A Field Guide to the Birds of Taiwan (2014), the first Taiwan bird guide to be illustrated entirely by a Taiwanese illustrator.

He notes that every bird species has its own character. Ducks and geese are more elegant, with their long S-shaped necks. Some other birds are more skittish, with their alert eyes and wary movements. By including these traits in his illustrations, he captures their unique appearance and personality, their spirit and their vitality.

An irreplaceable art form

At present Chen is not overly fussy about accuracy in his work. He prefers to capture the vitality of the natural world as he perceives it. Scientific illustration is just a means of expressing his affection and apprehensions for the natural world.

A decade ago he created Primitive Taipei, a painting that depicts the Taipei Basin as it might have looked 500 years ago. Capturing a lost ecosystem required him to rely on his imagination while also applying our scientific understanding of the natural world of that day.

For the setting he chose the landscape of Shipai, an area in modern Taipei’s Beitou District. He adorned this landscape with the nearly extinct bamboo orchid and the blue lotus, which is thought to be extinct in the wild in Taiwan, along with sika deer foraging in shallow water and otters playing in the wetlands.

These are scenes impossible to capture through photography. Chen hopes that this type of imaginative rendering of the natural world will resonate with humanity’s collective unconscious. In this way he hopes to stimulate discussion and contemplation and arouse public interest in the natural world. 

Li Cheng-lin recalls that it took him four and a half years to complete the illustrations for A Field Guide to the Birds of Taiwan. Just as he was beginning the project his mother was diagnosed with cancer, and she passed away six months later. The pain of losing his mother was almost unbearable. It affected his work, and his editor noted that the birds he painted had a sorrowful appearance.

The loss slowed Li’s creative output, but he threw himself into the difficult job of illustrating birds of the sandpiper family (Scolopacidae), which have complex markings and a high degree of similarity. He had to render the differences clearly so that the viewer can easily distinguish between different birds. He learned to divide the bird’s body into different blocks and identify the patterns of each section of plumage. Once this was done, he replicated the results to fill in other parts of the body.

During this difficult period, Li found great comfort in observing his favorite bird species, the sanderling, a small wading bird with a body only 20 centimeters long. He tells us how once when he went birdwatching by the sea, as he watched the tides roll in and out he noticed the sanderlings darting in and out between the waves, scavenging for food. Li uses his fingers to show the birds’ size as he says excitedly: “Just look how small they are, and yet they fly all the way from Alaska to Australia, migrating twice a year. They have likely traveled to more countries than us and certainly flown farther. We will probably never witness the sights they have seen. But wherever they land, all they do is fill themselves up by feeding on tiny bugs in the wet sand along the shoreline, fulfilling their role in nature.”

Reflecting on these stories while working on his illustrations, Li came to terms with his mother’s passing. He realized that her life’s journey had come to an end, while his work as an illustrator was not yet done. He found a certain tranquility, and the quality of his work improved.

The illustrator as conservationist

When we met Chen Yi-ming, who is in his sixties, he explained that he has not done traditional scientific illustrations for quite some time because they are time-consuming and hard on the eyes. “But I do what I like to call ‘ecological illustrations,’” he says.

As a child Chen loved nature and longed to explore the distant mountains. In college he majored in forestry, and after graduation he began to explore the wilds that had so fascinated him as a youth. For many years now he has participated in ecological fieldwork.

He was surprised to find out how much Taiwan’s ecology has changed in a short period. “We all worry about the ecology of the mountain regions, but we didn’t realize that the lowland areas had already changed beyond recognition,” he says.

With this change of topic Chen becomes somber. Cement structures have replaced natural riverbanks, and riversides have been converted to parks for human use. Flood control projects have resulted in considerable destruction of aquatic ecosystems and prevented migratory fish from returning. He is saddened to see how these natural landscapes have been transformed to suit human activity.

Chen and some likeminded friends have redirected their conservation efforts from Taiwan’s mountains to its coastal plains, where most of the population lives. These illustrators believe they can help people appreciate the beauty of the natural world, learn about the insects, birds and animals that inhabit it, and become more aware of the environmental degradation occurring around us. They hope to use their work to change public attitudes. “This is our most pressing responsibility at present,” says Chen.    

Li Cheng-lin explains how the idea of an “ecological niche,” which describes the particular role a species may play in an ecosystem, helped lead him to scientific illustration. As a kid, he first wanted to be president and then an astronaut. He even dreamed of becoming a star teacher, inspired by the Japanese manga series Great Teacher Onizaku. But in the end he discovered scientific illustration and settled into the work.

Li’s own journey of discovery has inspired him to capture nature’s many marvels through his illustrations. His work allows viewers to see the world from countless angles and interact with it in myriad ways. By providing more diverse ways to understand the natural world, Li is giving viewers the opportunity to discover their own relationship with nature, just as each species finds its unique role in an ecological habitat. 

Before the advent of cameras, scientific illustration helped people get to know the multifaceted world around them. Today illustrators have taken on the role of educators, striving to enlighten a public estranged from nature about the wonders of biodiversity.

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

繁體中文 日文

科學繪圖

文‧鄧慧純 圖‧莊坤儒

「科學繪圖」源自昔日相機尚未發明的時代,科學家為紀錄動、植物的種類特徵,透過簡單的繪圖工具與觀察,繪出栩栩如生的物種,不僅成為獨門的藝術形式,也開啟我們對多元世界的認識。

 


 

科學繪圖演示是國立自然科學博物館(簡稱「科博館」)內引人駐足的角落。以透明玻璃窗隔出的明亮空間,除了陳列各種標本,畫桌上還有調色盤、顏料、畫具及顯微鏡。繪圖員彭瑄玉拿著水彩筆熟練地為狂蟻的步足上色,一旁的攝影機將她動作的細節傳送到玻璃窗外的電視上,讓民眾仔細端詳,不時有好奇的民眾貼著玻璃看得入迷,她也會透過麥克風與民眾互動。

一探科學研究的幕後花絮

這是科博館的獨門特展,彭瑄玉常笑稱自己是「活的常設展」,長年在玻璃屋內創作,從兩棲爬蟲類、囓齒類、無脊椎類到太陽星系星球都收在她的筆下,成為一張張講究科學性又活靈活現的科學繪圖。

把科學研究的幕後工作搬到幕前來,讓民眾一探究竟,是科博館科學教育組副研究員劉德祥的點子。長年推動科普教育,他解釋:「靈感來自大家都愛看的電影幕後花絮」,於是他設計把科學家研究的幕後歷程、邏輯展示出來,此舉果然讓科學繪圖演示成為科博館的人氣角落。

科博館已舉辦12年的科學繪圖研習及競賽,藉由研習課程,帶領民眾從科學繪圖的源由、觀察、繪圖技巧、實作等階段逐一操作,無論是以針筆或代針筆「點畫」,用黑點的疏密程度來表達明暗和立體感,或是彩繪動植物的特徵細節,都希望勾起民眾對科學的興趣。

劉德祥解釋「科學繪圖是指透過圖像為媒介來傳達科學訊息」。自然界許多現象無法以肉眼觀察、或當文字敘述過為抽象累贅之時,一張圖像勝過千萬語言,圖像能進行更有效率的溝通。

「科學繪圖的本質就是溝通」,它的範疇極廣,不論是圖鑑式的寫實描繪、或常見於科學期刊的點畫,甚至漫畫都可稱為科學繪圖。劉德祥的專長在演化生態學,他以植物授粉並萌發出花粉管至胚珠變成種子的歷程為例,這些過程肉眼都不可見的,但歷程中許多細節變化需要藉大量文字說明才得以理解,因此他曾創作一幅漫畫,讓花粉在跳跨欄,比擬這段歷程,讓人一眼就懂,因此劉德祥說:「科學繪圖不一定要寫實,只要能達到溝通的目的。」

當前流行的資訊圖表(infographics)也是科學繪圖的一種,劉德祥表示,數字是科學研究的重要產出,但如何將枯燥的數據轉化成有吸引力的圖像,則是另一項挑戰。

觀察是科學繪圖的入門

科學繪圖的第一步驟是觀察。觀察物件的真實樣態,一五一十地記錄下來。

彭瑄玉回想當初接觸科學繪圖的首個任務是畫鯨豚,她依照自己的印象,把鯨豚畫得圓圓胖胖的,頗為可愛;但研究人員一看就指正鯨豚有標準的外型,差一點都不行;剛開始她以為是研究人員過度吹毛求疵,但隨著作品的累積,她的觀念也逐步修正,正確性是首要考量,從此不管是畫老鼠的牙齒,昆蟲的觸鬚、步足,都仔細觀察形狀、數量、跟身體的比例。「觀察」也開啟她的視野,在顯微鏡下觀察蒼蠅,彭瑄玉讚嘆:「服裝設計師都只愛看孔雀,卻沒人發現蒼蠅的配色漂亮極了。」如今,在科學繪圖的領域裡,她越畫越自得其樂。

科學繪圖更重要是培養觀察力,劉德祥指出,孩子能從觀察一個細微的現象,學會提出問題,進而探究背後的原因,引導此後一系列的研究探討。

服務於行政院農業委員會林業試驗所森林保護組的陳一銘,是國內科學繪圖的先進,長年從事生態調查,擁有豐富的野外經驗。我們與他約訪在台北植物園,他親身示範如何進行觀察記錄。園區內一隻野鳥正悠閒地踱步,陳一銘一手持速寫本,一手拿鉛筆迅速畫下野鳥的頭部特徵,再用望遠鏡細看野鳥走路的姿勢,在畫紙另一個角落草草描繪鳥的身形。陳一銘解釋,在野外無法慢工細活地描繪,但可粗略記錄下特徵和姿態,做為日後繪圖的參考資料。

完成第一本國人自繪的《台灣野鳥手繪圖鑑》的李政霖,書中共搜羅約650種鳥類,其中他曾親眼觀察過350種,「圖鑑創作事實上大量依賴照片,才能畫下鳥的身體細節,但如果你曾經親眼觀察過牠日常活動的樣態與氣質,那產出的成果會與單憑照片的創作差很多。」

他說鳥的情緒要從肢體的動作觀察。一隻鳥如果站得直挺,全身羽毛貼緊身子,通常處於警戒中;如果看到鳥的身體縮成一顆球狀,羽毛澎起來,那就是放鬆的狀態。每種鳥類也有各自的氣質,鴨子與鵝的體態較優雅,脖子比較長,常常彎成S狀;某些鳥則較神經質,眼神和姿態常常感覺緊張兮兮地。他將這些細節安排進他的作品中,表現鳥的氣質與個性,讓他筆下的鳥類有了靈魂,更顯生動。

無可取代的手繪

科學繪圖領域中,攝影技術的出現不曾取代傳統手繪技法,反而使我們更了解科技的侷限,凸顯手繪特有的價值與創作性。

如今,陳一銘的作品已經不過度強調正確性,他更想呈現他眼中世界的生命力,藉科學繪圖為工具,傳達他對地球的關心與憂心。

十年前他創作《蠻湮台北》,想像500年前台北盆地的樣子。要重建一個已經消失的生態系,就需要加上更多的想像,同時又不能偏離科學依據。

因此,他把畫面的場景設定在今日北投石牌一帶,背景是面天山。考據漢人還沒進入台北盆地的蠻湮之況,陳一銘將已幾近消失的野生葦草蘭、已滅絕的藍睡蓮安排在畫面中,淺水處有梅花鹿在覓食,濕地有野生水獺出沒,畫面的時間設定在秋季,遠方台灣欒樹正開花,近處的棋盤腳花期將盡。光影也有所考據,他從Google Earth模擬早上八點太陽的光線角度,描摹出背景山系的明暗。

如此的創作自是攝影無法達成,陳一銘希望藉由這樣的生態創作,勾起人類共同潛意識裡的感動,激發更多的討論與思考,喚起公眾對自然生態的重視。

李政霖回憶《台灣野鳥手繪圖鑑》四年半的手繪歷程。曾是國小自然科代課老師的他,後來決定轉以科學繪圖為業,多是靠著母親的支持與鼓勵才得以堅持。唯母親卻在專案剛開始不久發現罹癌,在半年內撒手人寰。失恃之痛,讓他幾乎失了心緒,鳥怎麼都畫不好,當時審畫的編輯評論他畫的鳥看起來都不快樂。

創作面臨低潮,他的工作進度正遇到挑戰性頗高的鷸科鳥類,這群鳥身上的斑紋繁複,且雷同度高,但身為圖鑑的繪圖者,卻必須要仔細繪製,讓觀者能輕易辨識特徵。他學著把鳥的身體切分成不同區塊,細細觀察每一個部位羽片的邏輯,只要找出一片的規律,其他就可依樣複製。

真正帶他走出瓶頸的還是他最鍾情的鳥類。有一回利用休假去海邊賞鳥,看著潮汐間,身軀只有20公分長的三趾濱鷸在浪進浪退間覓食,「你看牠的體型最多這樣(李政霖張開手指示意),但你知道牠飛行的距離從阿拉斯加一直到澳洲,牠每一年遷徙兩次,南來北往,牠去過的國家、飛行的里程數、見過的世面也遠遠超過我們。但牠這麼小的身子,每到一個地方只做一件事,就是啄食泥灘地裡的小蟲子,盡自己的本分而已。」李政霖情緒略微激動一口氣說了好多。「還有斑尾鷸,牠是地球上飛行生物中『直飛紀錄保持者』,路程長達一萬五千公里,一旦起飛就是兩個星期都不吃不喝不休息,我用Trivago查牠的航線,全球只有一班直達機,其他都要轉機。」

一邊畫著鳥,一邊想著這些故事,李政霖突然看開了,覺得生命不就如此,母親的生命旅程已經圓滿,而自己的繪畫生命還在持續。自此他的心情沈澱下來,就像是一種修行,找出事情的道理,按部就班的做,接續的創作也就越來越好。

畫出自然,搶救環境

其實年過六旬的陳一銘,與我們初見面就表示,他已經很久沒畫傳統的科學繪圖了,因為耗時間,也耗眼力。「但是我還在做的是『生態繪圖』。」

從小喜愛自然,遙遠的深山是他兒時的嚮往,大學讀了森林系,工作後有機會親赴真正的荒野,陳一銘投入生態調查,就此鑽入荒野多年。

不料,家園突變,「我們都在關懷山上的生態,卻沒發現山下的家園已經完全面目全非了。」話鋒一轉,陳一銘心痛地說。水泥構造物取代原本有機的河岸,河邊被改造成人工化的河濱公園,河川整治工程卻造成大量的水中生態系被破壞,也造成許多迴游魚類無法回家。人類將自然逕自改造成自己喜歡的樣子,而無視原本生態的樣貌,這讓他很痛心。

「我和一些朋友,最近都開始把我們的戰場從山上轉移到平地。」陳一銘說。他們認為民眾的觀念需要被改變,而繪圖者能做的事是藉由科學繪圖創作讓民眾體驗自然的美,除了能多識於蟲魚鳥獸之名,也正視身邊的環境正被破壞,「這是我們近代最重要的任務了。」

李政霖從「生態棲位」(niche)的角度解釋科學繪圖對他的影響。生態棲位指的是一個物種在生態系統裡面的位置,並非單指棲息環境,還包括在生態系統中扮演的角色與能使用的資源等等。李政霖說他從小的志向從國父轉變為太空人,也曾一度認真想當一位麻辣教師,最終卻在科學繪圖找到自己的歸屬,安身立命於此。

因為曾經歷這段尋覓的過程,李政霖更希望透過自己的作品,盡力把自然事物的美好呈現出來。他想藉由創作告訴大眾,每個人可以有千百種角度去認識世界,有千百種方式與世界互動。他希望透過作品勾起大眾對自然的嚮往,而不再只追逐數位虛擬的聲色刺激。當認識世界的方式變得多元了,價值不再單一,每個人就可以在其中找到自己,不需再與其他人攀比,就像在環境中找到自己的生態棲位一般。

「你知道以前社子堤防外、百齡橋那頭,晚上有螢火蟲、蛇、青蛙、各式各樣的魚類出沒嗎?」陳一銘語帶感慨的說。

昔日相機尚未發明的時代,科學繪圖開啟我們對多元世界的認識,而在當代,科學繪圖再一次擔負啟蒙的角色,繪者們正努力勾勒一幅生物多樣性的未來,期望喚醒已遠離生物多樣性的人們。

自然界の多様性を伝える

文・鄧慧純 写真・莊坤儒  翻訳・松本 幸子

「科学イラスト」(サイエンティフィック・イラストレーション)は、カメラがなかった時代、科学者が生物の特徴を記録するために、動植物を生き生きと描いたものだ。独自の芸術形式を持ち、我々に多様な世界を見せてくれる。


実際に科学イラストを描く様子が、国立自然科学博物館(以下「科博館」)で見られる。ガラスで仕切られた明るいスペースに、さまざまな標本が陳列され、机上にはパレットや絵具、顕微鏡などが並ぶ。イラスト・スタッフの彭^١玉が慣れた手つきでヒゲナガアメイロアリの足に色をつけていく。そばに備え付けられたカメラによって彼女の手元がガラス外のモニターに映し出されるので、人々は細部も見ることができる。ガラスの中を熱心に覗き込む人もいるし、彼女もマイクを通して見学者と話すことができる。

学術研究の舞台裏

これは、科博館オリジナルの展覧だ。彭^١玉は自分のことを笑って「生きた常設展」と呼ぶ。長年ガラス内に座り、爬虫類やげっ歯類、無脊椎動物、太陽系の惑星といったさまざまなものを科学イラストに描いてきた。

本来なら学術研究の舞台裏と言える仕事を、見学者に見てもらおうというアイデアは、科博館科学教育係の副研究員である劉徳祥が考え出した。長年、科学教育推進に携わってきた彼は「舞台裏って、誰でも見たがるものでしょう」と言う。果たしてこの実演展示は、科博館の人気コーナーになった。

科博館ではすでに12年にわたり、科学イラストの研修やコンテストを催している。参加者は研修を通し、科学イラストの歴史、観察方法やイラストの技法を学ぶ。点描で明暗や立体感を出したり、動植物の細部に色をつけたりすることで、科学への興味を高めてもらうのがねらいだ。

劉徳祥は「科学イラストとは、図を媒体として科学的情報を伝えるものです」と言う。自然界には肉眼では見られない物が多く、文章で説明すると抽象的になり過ぎる場合、1枚の絵は有効にものごとを伝えられる。

「科学イラストの本質は伝達です」その範囲は極めて広い。図鑑にあるような写実的な図や、科学雑誌で見るような点描、時には漫画的なイラストもその範疇に入る。進化生態学が専門の劉徳祥は、植物の受粉から花粉管が伸び、胚珠、種へと変化する過程を例に挙げる。こうした過程は普通見ることができないし、変化の細部を文章にすると長い説明になる。それで彼はその様子を花粉がハードルを跳び越える漫画にして説明したことがある。「科学イラストは写実である必要はなく、伝達という目的が達せられればいいのです」

流行りのインフォグラフィックも、科学イラストの一種だ。劉徳祥によれば、数字は学術研究にとって大切なデータだが、この無味乾燥な数値をいかに魅力的なイラストにするか、それには高いテクニックが必要とされる。

観察こそ科学イラストの初歩

科学イラストの第一ステップは観察だ。ものの真実の姿をとらえ、逐一記録する。

彭瑄玉が最初に手掛けた科学イラストはクジラやイルカだった。自分のイメージにあるそれをぽっちゃりと可愛く描いた。だが研究員は一目見て「標準の外見ではない」と訂正を求めた。彼女は最初のうち「たいした違いではないのに」と不満に感じたが、やがて「正確さが何より重要」と考えるようになった。ネズミの歯でも昆虫の足でも、形や数、体との比率を細かく観察する必要がある。そして観察によって彼女は新たな視野を得た。顕微鏡でハエを見ながら「孔雀の羽の色は皆がきれいだと言いますが、ハエの色の美しさを知る人はほとんどいません」と言う彼女は、今やイラストを描くことに楽しみが尽きない。

科学イラストに大切なのは観察力を磨くことだ。劉徳祥によれば、子供は観察によって細かなことに気づき、そこから疑問が生まれ、その原因を探ろうとするようになる。

行政院農業委員会林業試験所森林保護係で働く陳一銘は、台湾における科学イラストの先駆者だ。長年、生態調査に携わり、豊富なアウトドアの経験を持つ。インタビューの場所だった台北植物園で、彼は観察記録を実演してくれた。ちょうど野鳥が1羽歩いていたので、陳一銘は携えたクロッキー帳に鉛筆でトリの頭を描き出した。それから双眼鏡で歩く姿を細かく観察し、余白にトリの姿全体を素早く描いてみせた。戸外ではじっくり描けないので、ざっと姿や特徴を記録しておき、後にイラストを描く際の参考にする。

台湾で初めて自分のイラストを集めた『台湾野鳥手絵図鑑』を出版したのは李政霖だ。同著には650種の鳥類が網羅されているが、そのうち自分で実際に観察したのは350種、「図鑑のイラストの多くは写真を見て描いています。でなければ細部まで描けません。でも、自分で実際に姿や雰囲気を観察したものは、写真だけに頼ったものとはイラストの出来が大きく異なります」と言う。

トリの感情は動作を観察すればわかると彼は言う。まっすぐ立って全身の羽をぴったりと体につけていれば、たいてい警戒している時だし、体が丸まり、羽毛を膨らませている時はリラックス状態にある。トリによって気質も異なる。カモやガチョウは首をS状に長く伸ばして優雅だし、神経質なトリは目や動作もせわしなく、緊張気味だ。李政霖はトリのこうした気質や性格まで生き生きと描き、イラストに魂を吹き込む。

手描きの持つ価値

写真技術の出現は、イラストに取って代わることができなかったばかりか、むしろ科学技術の限界を顕わにし、手描きの持つ価値や創作性を浮き彫りにした。

現在、陳一銘は作品に過度な精確性は求めず、むしろ自分の目で見た世界の生命力を表すようにしている。それは科学イラストを通し、地球に対する思いや憂いを表すことでもある。

10年前の彼の絵画『蠻湮台北』は500年前の台北盆地を想像して描いたものだ。もはや存在しない生態系を再現するには想像力が必要だが、かといって科学的根拠が欠けてはいけない。

そこで彼は、場面を現在の北投石牌辺りに設定し、背景に面天山を描いた。漢人の入植が始まる前の台湾盆地なので、現在絶滅しつつあるナリヤランや、すでに絶滅したホシザキスイレンが咲き、湖の浅瀬でタイワンジカが食べ物を探し、カワウソも泳ぐ。季節は秋で、遠景ではタイワンモクゲンジが咲き、近景にはゴバンノアシが真っ盛りだ。光の具合もGoogle Earthを用いて朝8時の太陽の角度を計算し、背景の山に明暗をつけた。

こうした方法は写真では不可能だ。陳は、絵によって人々の心を呼び覚まし、そこから討論や思考が生まれ、生態への関心が高まればと考える。

李政霖は『台湾野鳥図鑑』の絵を描いた4年半を思い出す。小学校で理科の代替教師をしていた彼は、科学イラストを仕事にしようと決めたが、それも母親のサポートと励ましがあったからこそ続けられた。ただ、同作の話が来てまもなく母親は癌に罹り、半年足らずで亡くなってしまった。悲しみの余り、トリの絵もうまく描けなくなり、編集者からも「描くトリが暗い」と言われた。

最も苦しい時期に、難度の高いシギ科を描かねばならなかった。シギ科は模様が複雑で、しかもどの種もよく似ているが、見た人が識別できるよう描き分ける必要がある。体をいくつかの部分に分け、部位ごとの羽の法則を見つけ出した。

そんな中、彼をどん底から救い出してくれたのはやはりトリだった。ある休みの日に海辺でバードウォッチングしていると、20センチほどのミユビシギが波間で餌を探していた。「(指を開いて見せながら)体はこれぐらいしかないのですよ。なのにアラスカからオーストラリアまで毎年2回行き来します。行ったことのある国、飛んだ総距離、見てきた世界、どれも我々のそれをはるかに超えています。どこへ行っても一つのことしかしません。水辺の泥や砂地で小さな虫をついばむという、己に課せられた仕事をやるだけです」李政霖はやや興奮気味にこう続けた。「ほかにもオオソリハシシギというトリは、飛ぶ生物の中では『直行記録保持者』で、1万5000キロを2週間、飲まず食わず休憩なしで飛び続けます。この飛行路線に匹敵する飛行機があるか、ネットのトリバゴで調べましたが、わずか1路線だけ、ほかは乗り換えが必要でした」

そのうち、彼はふと人の人生も同じだと思えた。母親の人生の旅は終わり、自分の絵描き人生はまだ続く。そう思うと心は落ち着き、まるで修行で悟りを得たかのようだった。コツコツと描き続けるうちに作品もよくなっていった。

自然を描き、環境を救う

すでに60歳台の陳一銘は、最初に会った際、「もう長いこと科学イラストは描いていない」と言った。時間がかかるし、目も疲れるからだ。だが「生態イラスト」は描いている。

幼い頃より自然が好きで、遠くの山にあこがれた。大学では森林学科に入学、就職して山に入る機会を得た。生態調査をやりながら長年、大自然に分け入ってきた。

ところが、「山の生態に気をとられている間に下界が昔の姿をなくしていました」と彼はつらそうに語る。コンクリートが川辺を覆い、人工的な河川敷公園ができていた。河川治水工事は水中の生態系を破壊し、多くの回遊魚が故郷に戻れなくなった。人間は生態の元の姿を無視して自分の好きなように自然を改造している。

「私や友人たちは自分の闘うべき場を山から平地へと移しました」自分たちのできることは、科学イラストによって、人々に自然の美しさを感じてもらうことだ。虫や魚、鳥、動物の名を知ってもらい、周囲の環境破壊を直視してもらう。「それが今、最も重要な任務です」

李政霖はこう言う。生物が生態系の中で自己の存在するそれぞれのニッチ(生態的地位)を持つように、自分も幼い頃から将来なりたいものが「国父」「宇宙飛行士」「人気教師」ところころ変わったものの、最終的には科学イラストの描き手に落ち着いた。そうしてたどり着いた場で、彼は自然の美しさを描き、人々を自然に惹きつけようと努める。この世界を知り、それとふれあうには、何千何百という角度や方法がある。他者と自分を比べる必要はなく、誰でも自分のいるべき場所を見つけることができる。それは、生物が生態系の中に自分の場を持つのと同じなのだと。

「台北社子の堤防の外側、百齢橋の辺りには、以前はホタルやヘビ、カエル、さまざまなサカナがいたんですよ」と陳一銘はしみじみと語る。

写真がまだなかった時代、科学イラストは我々に多様な世界を見せてくれた。今、その描き手は再びその任務を担い、生物の多様な未来を描き出し、そこから遠く離れてしまった我々を呼び戻したいと願っている。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!