The Raknus Selu Trail

A Slow, Romantic Journey
:::

2018 / October

Cathy Teng /photos courtesy of Lin Min-hsuan /tr. by Jonathan Barnard


In 2018, a partly finished national-level hiking trail that stretches more than 400 kilometers was given its official name: the Rak­nus Selu Trail. Running through Hakka communities near Provincial Highway 3, it has been stitched together from old trails, farming roads, and narrow hiking paths. This area used to be covered with native camphor wood forests. When the Han Chinese pioneers first entered these mountains to cut the camphor trees, they ended up creating an industry that would earn Taiwan the moniker “kingdom of camphor.” The industry would connect Taiwan to the global shipping routes of the 19th century.


With that industry’s demise, camphor forests would be replaced by fruit orchards and tea plantations. With the construction of Provincial Highway 3, some of the roads that connected those settlements in former times were covered over with asphalt, while others, as they fell into disuse, were reclaimed by nature.

Members of the Taiwan Thousand Miles Trail Association spent more than half a year investigating on foot, walking both where there were paths and where there were none, to clear a way once more for the Raknus Selu Trail.

A trail along Taiwan’s “romantic highway”

The trail’s name comes from rak­nus, which is Ata­yal and Sai­si­yat for “camphor tree,” and selu, which is Hakka for “trail.” From the name, one can tell that this area holds the culture of both Aborigines and Hakkas. The trail’s route closely follows the route of Provincial Highway 3 as it connects old foot roads, farming roads and narrow trails between Tao­yuan’s Long­tan and Tai­chung’s Dong­shi. Although the trail can be quite narrow, at every twist and turn it shows off broad cultural and historical wealth.

Tsai Ing-wen’s first campaign for the presidency introduced a “Taiwan Romantic Route 3” plan, which aimed to bolster the tourism industries of Tao­yuan, Hsin­chu, ­Miaoli, and Tai­chung along the Provincial Highway 3 corridor by drawing inspiration from southern Ger­many’s Romantic Road. One fruit of this plan, Rak­nus Selu, pieces together a long trail intended exclusively for walkers, giving them opportunities to explore communities on foot, to experience nature up close, and to strengthen the economies of small towns.

The Taiwan Thousand Miles Trail Association, founded in 2006, announced back in 2011 that its next step after establishing a network of 3,000 km of trails around Taiwan would be to promote the creation of long-distance trails.

Finding a way through the wilds

“In fact there was never a single ‘Rak­nus Selu’ road that went all the way from Long­tan to Tai­chung,” explains the association’s deputy executive director, Hsu Ming-­chien.

The association linked together several old trails that were popular with hikers, but realized that many of the vehicular roads that they had chosen as connecting segments were ill-suited to become part of a hiking trail. Association members had to go out in the field to investigate for themselves and look for mountain trails to replace those segments of highway.

They found a set of topographical maps from the Japanese colonial era, which they compared to current maps. And they went into local communities to ask elders if they knew of any abandoned old roads or trails. In places where these efforts provided no leads, the members of the task force were left to their own devices. ­Huang Szu-wei, who is heading up this project for the association and took part in surveys of the entire route, explains that they might walk along a ridgeline or follow paths that locals use to cut bamboo shoots. They followed all leads, continually searching and exploring. Where there was no path to follow, they’d pull out machetes to make their own way, as group members behind them hung marker strips on trees to blaze the trail. Friendly locals would often give them lifts or offer them hot bowls of noodles on cold nights. Their hospitality was a heartwarming part of the process.

Apart from the popular old trails, the Rak­nus Selu Trail also features sections of roadways of important cultural significance that had completely disappeared. The hope is to bring these back to life. Hsu Ming-­chien cites the lao guan­dao—“the old government road”—which was the main route connecting ­Miaoli’s Dahu and Zhuo­lan during the Japanese era. Getting little use, some portions of the road were abandoned to nature. But on the topographical maps completed in 1904 you can find the road. “Before Provincial Highway 3, it was the most commonly used road hereabouts, and it didn’t fall into disuse until the highway opened,” Hsu explains. “So we felt it was important to make that road part of Rak­nus Selu.”

Digging up local stories

The trail association has also tried to locate a variety of sites of cultural significance along the trail. 

Chuhuangkeng can be found beside Expressway 72 in ­Miaoli’s Gong­guan Township. ­­Huang explains that this was the first site in Taiwan where oil was discovered. The world’s second oil well was sunk there in 1877.

The old Chu­yun and Chu­guan trails near Chu­huang­keng have also been included in Rak­nus Selu. The Fa­yun Temple affords views of Dahu, where Hakka and Aboriginal tribes once battled. A bit farther in the distance is the “Fan­zai forest” depicted in Cold Night, the river novel by Li Qiao. Today, the location is known as ­Jinghu Village, in ­Miaoli’s Dahu Township.

Continuing southward, on the Xie’ai Old Trail (the old Shi­tan‡Gong­guan road) alongside ­Miaoli County Route 26, Huang invites us to examine the old trail’s craftsmanship. On its stone steps one can vaguely see smooth indentations some five centimeters across, which he explains are the marks of chisels from back when the rock was split to build the road.

Next we hit the Shi­guang Old Trail in Hsin­chu’s ­Guanxi Township, which was once an important agricultural road connecting Shi­gangzi (the old name for Shi­guang) with Tao­yuan’s Long­tan. The stone pavers used here were rounded river rocks. ­Huang explains that the area was once a riverbed, and it was full of rocks that had been smoothed by the flow of water. When building the road, the pioneers used those river rocks, so the pavers look quite different from the large cut stones used to pave the old Shi­tan‡­Miaoli road. The height of the steps on these roads was also carefully considered to suit those carrying loads with shoulder poles.

Building the trail oneself

Only by having knowledge of how these roads were built can we gain a better understanding of the pioneers’ lives and the wisdom they demonstrated in living in balance with nature. The trail association has over the years assiduously promoted building trails by hand over the mechanized techniques used when projects like these are bid out to construction firms. Hsu explains that when you treat building a trail as an engineering project, the approach naturally becomes building it once to last forever. But the granite, cement and other outside materials that construction firms bring in are not things that have a lot of durability in nature. On the other hand, the most important consideration when making trails by hand is using materials that are found on site—because that makes it easy to perform regular maintenance. But handmade trails vary from place to place, so it is hard to describe in writing how to make them. Accordingly, the association has organized “trail-building holidays” for volunteers.

We participated on one such outing, repairing the Old Du­nan Road section of the trail. At one place where water had washed out a slope alongside the trail, causing collapse, the maintenance crew decided to lay down layers of rocks to create a solid base for the trail. At first, Hsu and an old master trail builder examined the face of the slope visually and discussed how to repair it. Then they led the team in looking for suitable large stones. The base of the trail that had been washed away needed to be filled in with large stones, which had to be selected for their size and shape. It’s important to plan before digging. After the stones were put down, they had to be turned to get the best fit. Only then were they fixed in place. Then smaller rocks and pebbles had to be found to fill in the gaps. Finally, sand was poured into the cracks to solidify the base. Once repaired, this stretch of trail looked just like neighboring stretches from the top, but from the side it resembled patched clothing. 

“This way of repairing trails is becoming a global trend,” says Hsu. “And it’s also the method the pioneers originally used.”

A Swedish engineer who has lived in Taiwan for five years was on the repair crew, as were volunteers from Taoyuan, Yilan, Changhua and Tainan. Sweat dripped off their brows and onto the soil, and their gloves became smeared with mud as they bent down to carefully examine the rocks. The biggest rocks were so heavy that volunteers could scarcely breathe as they moved them. But their lives became connected to the trail, and they were no longer strangers to the land. These experiences are some of the reasons volunteers come back to work on the trail again and again. As Hsu says, “Those who participate on these outings find them quite addictive.”

In the middle of July, at a press conference to announce the signing of a memorandum of understanding for a public‡private partnership to promote the Rak­nus Selu Trail, the nature writer Liu Ka-­shiang made an unforgettable speech. He pointed out that Provincial Highway 3, the Sun Yat-sen Freeway and the Formosa Freeway were all opened to traffic with the aim of facilitating speed—with the idea that fast, broad roads can foster economic development. But the Rak­nus Selu Trail, whose route was only finalized in 2018, is wholly different: “This slow road perhaps demonstrates how the values and meaning found in life are changing within Taiwanese society.”

The Rak­nus Selu Trail is the Taiwan Romantic Route 3’s most romantic feature. Its path was unknown before a group of people pieced it together segment by segment. In the years ahead many more groups of volunteers will donate their time and energy to it, lugging tools and moving rocks as they build and maintain the trail one stretch at a time.

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

日文 繁體中文

台3線「樟之細道」

文・鄧慧純 写真・林旻萱 翻訳・松本 幸子

2018年、全長400キロ余りに及ぶ長い遊歩道が「樟之細路」と命名された。地図に初めて出現したこの道は、主に客家集落を抜ける台3線(省道3号線)に沿って、古道や農業用道路、山道などをつないだものだ。この辺りはかつて天然のクスノキ林が広がり、樟脳生産のために伐採されていた。19世紀には、台湾を「樟脳王国」として世界にリンクさせた道だったのだ。


だが、やがて同産業の衰退に伴い、クスノキ林は背の低い茶畑や果樹園に取って代わられた。各集落をつないでいた古道も、台3線となってアスファルトが敷かれたところもあったが、使われない道は大自然に覆われてしまった。

それらの道を、千里歩道協会の人々が半年余りかけて再び探し出した。山や谷を越え、埋もれていた道や物語をつなぎ合わせたのだ。

ロマンティック街道

「樟之細路」の英語名はRaknus Selu Trailという。「Raknus」とは、タイヤル語やサイシャット語でクスノキのこと、「Selu」は「細路」を客家語読みしたもので「小道」という意味である。名前からも、先住民や客家など多様な文化にまつわることがわかる。かつては土地や経済的利益を争って衝突が繰り返されたが、今日では協力して暮らしている。「樟之細路」は、台3線沿いの、桃園龍潭から台中東勢までの古道や農業道路、小道をつないだ道で、新埔、関西、芎林、竹東、横山、北埔、峨嵋、南庄、三義、頭屋、獅潭、公館、大湖、卓蘭など、客家の10数の村を通る。道幅は狭いが、沿道にはそれぞれの豊かな文化が存在する。

蔡英文総統が総統選で掲げた「ロマンティック台3線」プランは、ドイツのロマンティック街道を参考に、山間を走る台3線を、桃園、新竹、苗栗、台中の観光の目玉にしようというものだった。「樟之細路」は、そのプランのいわば下位項目で、純粋な遊歩道作りを目指した。歩くことでさらに深く村に分け入り、自然に親しんでもらうのがねらいだ。

一方、2006年設立の千里歩道協会は、長年、台湾全土で遊歩道の開設に取り組んできた。2011年に全長3000キロ余りの台湾一周ルートを完成させた後、次の目標を長距離の遊歩道に置いたのだった。

山を越え谷を越え

「『樟之細路』という道が存在したわけではないし、龍潭から台中まで続く道などもなく、まして道というものは人の使い方で変化します。先住民や漢人が開墾し、やがて日本統治時代、国民政府と目まぐるしく変化してきました」と、千里歩道協会の副事務局長である徐銘謙は言う。

古道をよく知るお年寄りの提案で、登山愛好家たちがよく歩く古道をつなごうと当初は考えた。だが、それらの多くが一般車道や産業道路となっていることがわかり、遊歩道には向いていなかった。そこで仕方なく、自分たちで山に入り、ルートを探し出すことになった。

まず、かつての『台湾堡図』(日本統治時代に作られた地形図)を元に、さらに古今の地図を重ね合せてルートを探ったり、使われなくなった古道がないか地元のお年寄りに尋ねたりした。それでもわからなければ、自分たちで探し出すしかない。全ルートの調査に関わった黄思維によれば、4人ほどが1組になって、3人が山に入り、1人が車で送迎を担当、山での探索中、運転係は近隣の村で住民とおしゃべりしながら地元に伝わる話を聞き出した。山での探索は、稜線やタケノコ採りの道を歩いたり、道がない時は山刀で道を切り開き、後ろに続く者が木に目印のテープを結びつけていった。藪をなんとか抜けると目の前は崖だったり、民家の裏庭に出てしまうこともあったという。まるで昔の冒険談を聞いているかのようだ。山奥で出会った人に、車で送ってもらったり、温かい麺をごちそうになったりしたこともあり、そんな時は人の温かみが身にしみた。

すでに失われた道を再現したことは、失われた文化の掘り起こしにもつながなった。徐銘謙は「老官道」を例に挙げる。それは、日本統治時代に苗栗大湖と卓蘭を結ぶ主要道路だったが、やがて産業道路が開通すると、多くが使われず荒廃してしまった。だが、1904年に日本人が作成した『台湾堡図』や、ほかの地図では、この「老官道」がはっきりと示されている。村民の話では、かつて教師をしていたお年寄りが子供の頃、老官道を通学路にしていたという。「それは、かつて最もよく使われた道でしたが、後に台3線の開通で使われなくなったのでした。我々は、この老官道を再現して樟之細路に組み込むことにしました」と徐銘謙は言う。

地元の物語を発掘

道は人が歩いてきたものだから、人のいるところには物語がある。樟之細路でもあちこちに、いにしえの人々の足跡が残されていた。

千里歩道協会の探索では、伯公廟(土地神を祀る祠)や茶畑、灌漑用水路など、多様な文化的スポットの発見もあった。樟脳寮坑や上樟樹林などの地名は、当時の樟脳産業と関係があることがわかるし、漢人が入植した際に先住民との境界に設けた隘勇線(柵や砦など)も残っていた。

72号線脇の出磺坑(苗栗公館郷)は、黄思維によれば、台湾で最も早くに石油が発見された場所だったという。1877年発掘のこの台湾初の油田は、世界で2番目の油田でもあった。周辺には今もトロッコ道や重機整備庫、宿舎、掘削設備が残り、当時の盛況が偲ばれる。

その附近の出雲古道(出磺坑‐関刀山)と出関古道(出磺坑‐関刀山)は、樟之細路の主要ルートに組み込まれた。近くの法雲寺に上ると大湖が見下ろせる。この辺りは客家が入植した頃、先住民と衝突の絶えなかった地域で、さらに足を伸ばせば、李喬の大河小説『寒夜』の舞台となった蕃仔林(現在の苗栗県大湖郷静湖村)もある。

続けて北上し、苗26県道の脇にある「楔隘古道」(獅潭‐公館)を目指す。古道に着くと黄思維が説明してくれた。古道の石段に2ヵ所、5センチほどへこんだ部分があるが、これは大きな岩にノミを差し込んで割った跡だという。石段を登りつめると、先人が客家語で残した「上りは鼻に触り、下りは髻に触る」という言葉が掲げられている。この急な石段を上り下りするさまを形容したもので、先人の苦労が偲ばれる。

次は新竹関西の「石光古道」だ。かつては石岡子(現在の石光地区)と龍潭を結ぶ農業上重要な道だった。この辺りの石段に丸い石が多く使われているのは、黄思維によれば、この辺りは元は河床で、こうした河原の石が大量にあったのを用いたものだという。楔隘古道が大きな岩を割って用いたのと同様に、当時の人が身近な材料を用いたことがわかる。ここの石段の段差がやや小さいのも、当時の人が天秤を担いで上り下りする際に揺れが少ないように考えられたものだという。

自らの歩道は自らで

こうしたことを知ることで、自然とともにあった先人の暮らしがうかがえる。千里歩道協会でも歩道の「手作り」を進めてきた。徐銘謙はその取り組みの意義をこう説明する。もし業者に工事を頼めば、花崗岩やセメントを用いた頑丈なものを作ることになる。だが、こうした材料は、実は大自然の中では意外ともろく、破損によって再び工事が必要となる。一方、「手作り」が大切にするのは、身近な材料を用い、場所に応じた施工と定期的な整備を行うことだ。

「場所に応じた施工」をマニュアル化するのは難しい。そこで協会では、施工ボランティアに歩道の地形や地質をじっくり観察してもらう日を設けることにした。実際に石を動かしたり運んだりして、まるで元々そこにあったような位置や角度に石を置くことを学んでもらう。

我々もそれに参加してみた。その日は「渡南古道」の修復だった。ルートの一部が斜面からの雨水で崩れていた。臨時に竹を渡して通れるようにしていたのを、基礎部から石を積み上げて直すことにする。まず徐銘謙と専門の職人が斜面の状況を見ながら施工方法を相談する。その後、二人の導きで、適当な大きさの石を探して回った。基礎部を作るのに適した形や大きさが必要だ。また、深さや幅を考えて基礎部を掘り、置いた石も角度をいろいろ変えながら安定した位置を見つける。その後、小型の石を間に詰めていき、その隙間に大量の砂土を埋めてしっかりと固める。上から見ると普通の道と変わらないが、側面から見ると、補われた部分だけ、さまざまな石がひしめき合っているのがわかる。

河原の石を用いたり、切った木を路肩に使ったりする場合もあるが、コンセプトは同様だ。大自然は規格があるわけではないので、自然に沿った方法を自ら見出さなければならない。「こうしたやり方は世界的潮流であり、また昔の人がやっていたことでもあります」と徐銘謙は言う。

今回、歩道修築に加わったボランティアには、台湾在住5年になるスウェーデン人エンジニアもいれば、桃園や宜蘭、彰化、台南などから来た人もいた。初心者もベテランもいっしょになって、石をわずか数歩分動かすのにも汗みどろになる経験をする。こうして、自分とこの道との、大地とのつながりが生まれる。多くが再びボランティアに加わるのもそのせいだろう。徐銘謙も「この経験でやみつきになるのですよ」と言う。

7月中旬、樟之細路を国際的にも発信しようという備忘録の調印が行われ、その記者会見でエコロジストの作家、劉克襄が語ったこんな言葉が心に残った。台3線、中山高速、北二高速などの開通はスピードを追求し、経済発展をもたらしたが、2018年の樟之細路はそれらとは異なる。「このスローな道は、台湾社会が求める生活が変わりつつあることを証明している」という。

樟之細路は、「ロマンティック台3線」プロジェクトの中でも最もロマンティックなものと言えるだろう。地域に散らばる物語をつなげるために、未知のルートを探ろうというものであり、重い石を一つ一つ、人の手で積み上げる手作りの道だからだ。千里歩道の事務局長である周聖心は「細道ですが、大道です」と言う。それは「スピード」から「スロー」へと、異なる価値観にいざなう道なのだ。今後は、さらに多くの市民が参加することを期待したい。

台三線「樟之細路」

文‧鄧慧純 圖‧林旻萱

2018年,全長四百多公里的國家級長程步道「樟之細路」正式被命名,這條之前不曾出現在地圖上的路徑,主要沿著以客家聚落為主的台三線,縱向串聯舊有的古道、農路、郊山步道而成。此地域昔日是大片的天然樟樹林,先民入山伐採煉腦,成就台灣樟腦王國的名號,也是帶領台灣通往十九世紀大航海時代與世界連結的路徑。

 


 

隨著產業興衰,高聳的樟樹林被低矮的茶園、果園取代,昔日貫通各部落、庄頭的古道,因為台三線修築,部分被鋪上了柏油;部分路徑因少人使用,被大自然收復。

千里步道協會的夥伴經半年多的踏查,從有路走到沒路,再硬開出一條細路,翻過山頭,越過稜線,把遺失的路一段段找回來,串聯起在地的故事。

浪漫台三線裡的「樟之細路」

「樟之細路」的英文名為Raknus Selu Trail,「Raknus」是泰雅族、賽夏族語中「樟樹」的意思,「Selu」是客語「細路」的發音,意思是小徑。從命名即可知這地域容納了原住民族與客家文化的多元,昔日他們為了地域與經濟利益,頻生無數衝突,而今日各族群在此地合作共生。在地域上,「樟之細路」沿著台三線,串聯桃園龍潭到台中東勢的古道、農路、小徑,沿途經過新埔、關西、芎林、竹東、橫山、北埔、峨嵋、南庄、三義、頭屋、獅潭、公館、大湖、卓蘭十數個客家小鎮,細路路徑不寬,卻在每個羊腸小徑裡藏著豐富的人文故事。

小英總統競選時提出「浪漫台三線」計畫,參考自德國「浪漫大道」觀光路徑的概念,想將遠離平原、被稱為內山公路的台三線沿線,以「浪漫台三線」的概念串聯,以此振興桃、竹、苗、中的觀光產業。「樟之細路」是該計畫下的子項,規劃串聯出一條純粹提供走路使用的步道,藉由步行深度的探訪社區、親近自然,也幫助小鎮的經濟。

而在民間,成立於2006年的「千里步道協會」,多年來推動了台灣諸多重要的步道運動,2011年,協會倡議完成全長三千多公里的環島路網後,下一步將目標轉向長距離健行步道的推廣。

山重水複疑無路的探查

「其實不是原本就有一條路叫做『樟之細路』,也不存在單一條路從龍潭一直走到台中。而且路是隨著人的使用一直在改變。經原住民與漢人開墾、取用山林資源,再到日治時代、國民政府時期,其實路都一直在變化。」千里步道協會副執行長徐銘謙解釋著。

一開始,協會依熟悉古道前輩們的建議,把登山界常用的幾條古道串聯起來,卻發現途中將會大量使用公路或產業道路,不符合當初想找出一條純粹提供走路使用的路線。協會的夥伴只能親自下海普查,找出可以替代公路的山徑。

他們翻出昔日的《台灣堡圖》(日治時期繪製的台灣地形圖),套疊古今的地圖、研判路線,或探訪社區耆老詢問當地是否有被棄置的舊古道。問不到路時,就自己想辦法。協會的專案秘書黃思維參與全路段的勘查,他分享一次出訪探查約4人一組,3人負責上山找路,1人負責開車接送,當其他同伴在探查時,司機就負責到鄰近社區,找居民開講(聊天),希望聊出更多在地的故事。踏查的過程有可能會走上稜線,或是沿著民家採竹筍的路,鑽鑽探探。在山重水複疑無路時,靠著山刀,自己的古道自己開,後方夥伴則負責在樹上綁上識別布條。常常鑽出樹叢後卻發現卡在邊坡上,或是從民家的別墅後花園掉出來。聽他的描述十足如武俠加上時空穿越劇的情節,過程艱辛又奇幻;也常遇好心民家開車接送,或是在寒夜遞上一碗燒燒的湯麵,這是踏查過程中最暖心的一節,也是台灣專屬的人情味。

樟之細路的定線,除了含括現今常用的古道外,部分已經消失卻別具文化意義的路徑也希望能被重現出來。徐銘謙舉「老官道」為例,這是日治時期連接苗栗大湖與卓蘭間的交通要道,該路段部分被改為產業道路,部分路段則因少人利用,而日漸荒廢,但在1904年日本人完成的《台灣堡圖》或其他地籍圖上都有這條「老官道」存在。在訪談中也得知,老官道曾是當地一位退休老師小時候通學的路徑,「它可以說是在台三線省道施工之前,大家最常使用的路徑,直到公路出現才取代了它的用途,所以我們覺得要把老官道劃入樟之細路的一部份,把它重現出來。」徐銘謙說。

挖掘在地的故事

路是人走出來的,有人的地方就有故事。樟之細路沿線,隨處可見昔日先民生活的腳印。

千里步道協會在探查中,同時爬梳路徑上多元的文化景觀,如途中常見的伯公廟、茶園景觀、水圳路等,從地名樟腦寮坑、上樟樹林就可知當地與樟腦產業的關聯,還有當初漢人為了屯墾,劃界設隘,區隔原住民族的隘勇線。

位在72號東西向快速道路旁出磺坑(苗栗公館鄉),黃思維解釋說,這地方是台灣最早發現石油的地方,1877年在此挖掘台灣第一口油井,也是世界第二老的油井。附近還留著當年鑽油而形成的產業聚落遺跡,台車索道、重機具維修庫、二十號宿舍、鑽油平台,都讓人遙想當年盛景。

出磺坑附近的出雲古道(出磺坑─法雲寺)跟出關古道(出磺坑─關刀山),一同被納入樟之細路的主線道。登上鄰近的法雲寺,從其平台眺望大湖,這邊是過去客家人和原住民相遇衝突的地點;再遠處則是李喬的大河小說《寒夜》裡故事的發生地蕃仔林(現苗栗縣大湖鄉靜湖村舊名)。

繼續北上,往位在苗26縣道旁的「楔隘古道」(獅潭─公館),黃思維引我們看古道工法的門道,石階上依稀可見兩處約5公分長的平整缺口,這是當年古道修築時,用小鑿子敲開大石的痕跡。石階的終點留有前人以客語寫下「上崎觸鼻孔,下崎觸髻鬃」的詩句,彷彿可想見前人行進時氣喘吁吁,生動的描述這段石階的陡直難行。

續行到新竹關西的「石光古道」,這是昔日連絡石岡子(石光社區舊稱)與龍潭間的重要農產古道。觀察當地的石階多是渾圓的鵝卵石,黃思維解釋,這地域原是河床地,佈滿被河水沖刷的鵝卵石,先民修路就地取材,也因此與楔隘古道取用大石頭再擊切的形狀不同。石階的高度較矮也有學問,是配合著挑擔人行走間扁擔起伏之震幅而修築設計的。

自己的步道自己修

了解前人步道修築的概念,才更能體會先民生活與自然共生的智慧。千里步道協會歷年來努力推動以手作步道取代工程發包,徐銘謙解釋,以工程的概念施作步道,自然落入一次性施作、永久保固的邏輯中,取用如花崗石、水泥等的外來原料,但這些東西在大自然裡是最不耐用的,常遇損毀需要再修復。而手作步道最重要的概念是就地取材、因地制宜和定期維護。

手作步道的工法常是因地而異、因地制宜的,難以用文字解釋,協會因此舉辦手作步道工作假期,讓志工實地觀察步道的地勢、地質條件,親身體驗搬運、挪移石塊,了解如何讓它以恰恰好的角度,坐立在路基上,就像是盤古開天以來就在那兒一般。

我們親自參與了一場工作假期,當天的任務是「渡南古道」維護。步道上有一處邊坡被水沖刷而坍塌,之前先用竹子搭了便道,這回打算用砌石工法讓路基更耐久。一開始徐銘謙和老師傅檢視邊坡立面,商討如何修補,接著帶大夥尋找收集合適的大石頭。被沖刷掉的路基要用大石頭當底基填補,需挑選形狀、大小適宜的石塊。挖鑿的空間亦要考量尺寸、深度,石頭到位後必須以各個角度翻轉、試放,直到尋得最穩固的位置,才將石頭定位。接續找尋中小型的石塊填補在石縫中,縫隙再倒入大量的砂土,強化穩固。修築完的邊坡從上方看來與一般的路徑並無二致,但從側面看像衣服的補丁,把缺損的一角再天衣無縫地填回。

其他還有從溪裡找石頭,或鋸木做路緣,工法概念大致相同,但因為大自然不像樂高積木的規格化,施作者只能自行發揮天才,取之自然、因地制宜。「這種方式是世界的潮流,也是先民的作法。」徐銘謙說。

這場參與修築步道的夥伴有已在台灣定居5年的瑞典工程師,也有從桃園復興區、宜蘭、彰化、台南各地奔來的志工,或許還是生手,或許已有豐富的山野經驗,大夥兒都體驗了從眉尖滴落的汗水沁入了土地,工作手套上沾滿了泥土,彎著腰細細端詳石頭的形狀,懷抱著沉甸甸的石頭,只挪移數步都讓人氣喘吁吁的過程。從此之後,自己的生命與這條路徑有了連結,人與土地的關係不再陌生,這是許多志工一再回來參與的原因,一如徐銘謙說:「參加過工作假期的人就會上癮。」

7月中旬,樟之細路公私協力國際推廣備忘錄簽署儀式記者會上,自然生態作家劉克襄的一段話著實令人難忘,他指出台三線、中山高、北二高通車,追求的是速度,是用快速的、寬闊的道路帶來經濟跟開發的可能性。但2018年定線的「樟之細路」是一條不一樣的道路,「這是一條慢的大道,印證了台灣社會所追求的生活價值與內容逐漸在改變中。」

「樟之細路」是浪漫台三線計畫中最「浪漫」的一個章節,是一群人探著未知的路徑,只為串聯起一段段有故事的路;未來也將是一群人荷著鋤頭,接力交遞沉重的石塊,一點一滴修築起來的手作步道。千里步道執行長周聖心說:「它雖然是一條細路,卻是一條大道。」這是一條帶起不同思維的大道,從快速到慢行,未來更期待它是市民公共參與的場域。       

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!