Finding Paradise in Taiwan

Dr. Peter Kenrick
:::

2019 / July

Esther Tseng /photos courtesy of Lin Min-hsuan /tr. by Scott Williams


Cambodian battlefields, Kurdish refugee camps in Iran, the Zambian countryside.... Dr. Peter Kenrick, chief of emergency medicine at Tai­tung Christian Hospital, has practiced medicine in many far-flung corners of the world. Asked about the motivation for his medical travels, he replies simply, “Just for fun!” Kenrick first came to Taiwan on a whim, and never imagined that Taitung would become his long-term home. After 34 years here, he states earnestly, “I am Taiwanese. I’m from Dulan, Taitung County.”


 

According to Confucius’ Analects: “The wise delight in water, the benevolent in mountains.” Dr. Peter Kenrick has arranged to meet us today at the Mt. Du­lan trailhead in the southern section of the Coastal Mountain Range. Standing on the viewing platform, Green Island and Orchid Island are clearly visible in the distance. Kenrick arrives on his bicycle, covered in sweat and a little out of breath. The tall and slender doctor offers us a precise explanation of his condition in Mandarin: “I just rode 4.2 kilometers, all of it up a grade that averaged 13.9%. It took 38 minutes.”

The 61-year-old Kenrick uses Mt. Dulan, which both the Amis and the Puyuma peoples consider holy, as his “gym.” Having also cycled the Pyrenees, which always feature in the Tour de France route, he gives the Du­lan ride a thumbs up: “This road is three or four times harder than the Pyrenees.”

Taitung, serendipitously

Born in Melbourne, Australia, Kenrick was preparing to return to Australia from Britain in 1985 when he happened to see a job posting for St. Mary’s Hospital in Tai­tung. The posting mentioned a two-month probation period, and the hospital was about halfway to his intended destination, so thought he might as well give the place a look. He never imagined his impulsive stopover would last for 34 years. 

He says he was lucky. On arriving in Taiwan, he traveled straight to lovely Tai­tung and its gorgeous scenery. He says if he’d gone to Taipei instead, his stay in Taiwan probably wouldn’t have lasted very long.

Kenrick had worked in Saudi Arabia and Zambia before coming to Taiwan.

He spent the first year of his residency in Saudi Arabia. While he made money there, he says that one year was enough for him: “Extremely conservative Islamic countries are very ‘abnormal.’ You have to be careful what you say. You can’t look at women. If you do look at one, it’s seen as her fault and she’s the one who is blamed!”

Kenrick then joined the Red Cross and was assigned to Zambia, where he worked in a 100-bed hospital that had only four doctors. He says that their patients were all seriously ill, suffering from issues such as periton­itis, bowel obstructions, and obstructed labor. With so many patients to treat, he worked more than 100 hours per week. Making matters still more challenging, the position was unpaid and he was expected to cover his own living expenses. “I spent nearly all I had. Taiwan, on the other hand, offered everything I could want, plus a salary of NT$20,000 per month,” recalls a smiling Kenrick, contrasting his experiences in the two countries.

Kenrick is an avid cyclist who got into the sport at the age of 15, and regularly rode more than 100 km at a time. After arriving in Taiwan, he became enamored with riding the mountainous trails through Taitung’s villages. In those days, he not only worked at St. Mary’s, but also visited indigenous villages to treat patients with a trained nurse and anesthetist named Sister Patricia Aycock. Taiwan’s National Health Insurance system didn’t yet exist, so they cared for patients who couldn’t afford to pay free of charge.

Doctor to the world

Kenrick went on another Red Cross mission in 1988, this time to Cambodia’s Kampong Speu Province. With the country in the midst of a civil war, Kenrick spent his days not only treating pneumonia, meningitis, and malaria, but also amputating the limbs of soldiers injured by landmines.

“When things were bad, I amputated legs every day. Six or seven or eight a day. Sometimes more than 20 a week. Outside the hospital, the gunfire was nonstop!”

His girlfriend (and later wife), Wang Yuan Ling, was a translator at St. Mary’s at the time. Kenrick was deeply moved when she made the difficult trip to Cambodia, traveling by way of Bangkok and Ho Chi Minh City, just to see him. After that, it seemed only natural that he would return to Taiwan once he finished his work in Cambodia.

Soulmates

As a young man, Kenrick was frustrated by Australia’s lack of big peaks and used to visit New Zealand every year to hike on its tallest mountain, Aoraki (Mt. Cook). In 1994 his itch to travel spread to Mt. Everest, for what would become nine consecutive years of hiking vacations in the area. But now he traveled with his wife, Wang Yuan Ling. “She’s probably one of very few Taiwanese women to have visited Mt. Everest so many times.”

In the mountains, Kenrick’s focus was not on scaling summits. Rather, hiking was an activity to enjoy when he wasn’t practicing medicine. In 2002, he spent three months as a volunteer doctor in a high-elevation clinic 4,500 meters up the slopes of Everest. “Is there anything more joyful than seeing patients in a place that offers you daily views of majestic peaks?”

While Kenrick cared for patients, Wang used the ­clinic’s small oven to make pineapple cakes from canned pineapples. The trail to the peak didn’t pass by the clinic, but when word of the cakes got around many professional climbers began dropping by to “admire” them. “The cakes enabled me to meet many famous climbers, including Peter Habeler, who was the first to summit Everest without supplementary oxygen, and Wally Berg, the first American to summit Mt. Lhotse, the world’s fourth-tallest peak.”

Kenrick moved to Taitung Christian Hospital in 2002, doing the work of one and a half doctors by seeing patients in both the emergency and outpatient clinics. The hours were grueling, but he periodically recharged himself with months-long leaves of absence serving as a ship’s doctor on icebreaker cruises with his wife. The leaves enabled them to spend portions of five con­secu­tive years exploring Alaska and both the Arctic and Antarctic Circles. “I loved traveling with my wife, so of course I wanted her to come with me. We sailed on all kinds of icebreakers, including the world’s largest nuclear-­powered icebreaker.”

Filling a void

“Returning to Taiwan reminds me how much I love it. Everything about it is great. It’s a paradise.” A puzzled Kenrick observes: “Many Taiwanese don’t understand that Taiwan is both beautiful and very safe. It’s not like Australia, where many drug users steal things and sell them to secondhand markets to support their habit. Taiwan doesn’t have many secondhand markets reselling stolen goods.”

In 2008, Typhoon Morakot knocked out the ­Southern Link railway and highway, isolating indigenous ­villages and cutting off support. Kenrick and a medical team from Taitung Christian Hospital flew into Daren Township’s Tuban Village (Tjuluqalju) by helicopter to provide emergency medical care and otherwise attend to disaster victims’ needs.

In a more recent effort to help people, the hospital has been raising money to build a cancer treatment center for patients in Taitung, and is now just NT$50 million short of its funding target.

However, Kenrick points out that the real challenge isn’t fundraising or construction, but rather finding doctors willing to staff rural medical facilities over the long term. Many leave after just two or three years in the countryside.

The always easygoing Kenrick’s expression turns serious when talking about areas in which Taiwan’s National Health Insurance system can still be improved: “If you want to resolve these kinds of problems, you have to learn from systems in other countries, and allow the doctors of family medicine who are on the front lines to carry out simple gynecological and surgical procedures. Reserve hospitals for serious conditions. That’s how you avoid wasting medical resources.”

A low point

Kenrick long desired to become a Taiwanese citizen. That feeling was particularly strong during his early years in Taiwan, when he worried every year that his residence permit wouldn’t be renewed. He gained permanent residency in 2004, but still couldn’t vote and enjoyed fewer rights than citizens in areas such as ­inheritance.

Kenrick personally designed his Dulan home, creating a villa-esque structure on previously un­developed land. An enthusiastic builder of model clipper ships from the age of 15, he is skilled at making things by hand, and has crafted the home’s bedframes, cupboards, dining chairs and even table lamps himself. He and his wife also painted the colorful oil paintings hanging from the walls in their spare time after returning to Taiwan from their trips to distant mountains.

Kenrick received Taiwanese citizenship in 2017, following the Ministry of the Interior’s amendment of the Nationality Act, and its acknowledgment of Kenrick’s contributions to Taiwan through his 30 years of practicing medicine in a rural area. On acquiring his Taiwanese ID, Kenrick, who is the winner of a Medical Dedication Award, stated: “My life and livelihood are here. I am Taiwanese. I’m from Dulan, Taitung County.”

Sadly, tragedy struck in the next year when Wang was killed in a traffic accident while cycling to work. This horrific loss was made all the worse by the fact that they didn’t have the opportunity to say goodbye to each other. Nevertheless, having Taiwanese citizenship did lessen some of the legal burdens associated with her death, such as matters related to the inheritance.

Asked how he’s doing, Kenrick says, “Not good! There’s a void in my life now.” But he then turns the conversation in a more positive direction, observing: “I still cycle, and still have furniture I want to make, so at least I’m keeping busy.”

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

繁體 日本語

台灣是天堂 杏林大玩咖

柯彼得醫師

文‧曾蘭淑 圖‧林旻萱

柬埔寨的戰場、伊朗庫德族的難民營、尚比亞的鄉間,都曾是台東基督教醫院急診科主任柯彼得的診療室。問他行醫天下的動機,他說:「Just for fun!」

然而意外來到台灣,沒想到依山傍水的台東卻成為柯彼得人生的歸屬,一待就是34年,他認真地說:「我是台灣人,我是台東都蘭人!」


 

「智者樂水,仁者樂山。」這一天與柯彼得醫師(Peter Kenrick)約在海岸山脈南段最高峰的都蘭山,站在登山步道入口的觀景台,遠眺波瀾壯闊的太平洋,綠島、蘭嶼清晰可見。剛「騎」車上來的他,汗如雨下,還有點喘,身材高瘦的他用國語準確地說:「騎了4.2公里,一路上坡,平均坡度13.9%,共花了38分鐘。」

這座被當地阿美族與卑南族人視為聖山的都蘭山,是61歲柯彼得平時的健身房。曾騎過環法自行車賽必經的法國庇里牛斯山區,仍忍不住為台灣的都蘭山打廣告:「這條路可是比庇里牛斯山難了三、四倍。」

剛好是台東

在澳洲墨爾本出生的柯彼得,1985年正準備從英國返回澳洲,看到台東聖母醫院需要醫生的廣告,試用期是兩個月。他想,台灣正好是路途的「中間」,就到台灣看看吧!這趟無心插柳的旅程,沒想到一待就是34個寒暑。

他說,運氣很好,當時一來到台灣就馬上到有山有水的台東,如果當時是在台北,可能早就離開台灣了。

其實,柯彼得來台灣之前,先在沙烏地阿拉伯與中非的尚比亞行醫。

他在住院醫師第一年就到沙烏地阿拉伯,雖然有錢賺,但他覺得待一年就夠了,因為在他的眼裡:「極端保守的伊斯蘭國家『非常不正常』,不能亂講話,不能亂看女生,而且你亂看女生,還是女生的錯,她反而被責怪!」

柯彼得後來加入國際紅十字會,被分派到尚比亞一家100多床的醫院,卻僅有四位醫師,送到醫院的都已是重症患者,腹膜炎、難產婦人、因為衛生不良造成的腸阻塞等,病人很多,每週工作超過100個小時,而且沒有領薪水,生活費還要自己出。「那時我錢快花光了,到了台灣,什麼都有,每個月還有2萬元台幣的薪水。」露出笑容的柯彼得比較兩國的天壤之別。

從15歲開始騎腳踏車,經常一騎就是100公里,來到台灣,台東部落的陡坡山徑成為柯彼得騎行飆車的最佳地點。除了在聖母醫院看診,他也跟著有護理、麻醉背景的艾珂瑛修女到各部落看診,當時台灣尚無健保,遇到看診病人無法支付醫療費時,他便免費看病。

在世界的各角落行醫

1988年柯彼得又接到國際紅十字會的任務,前往正在內戰的柬埔寨磅士卑省,每天除了應付肺炎、腦膜炎、瘧疾的病人,還有許多被地雷所傷必須截肢的軍人。

他解釋:「當時已經敗走邊境的紅色高棉波布政權,在戰場佈滿地雷,反擊親越南的傀儡政府,也就是柬埔寨人民共和國,卻導致許多柬埔寨軍人誤踩地雷被炸傷,嚴重時每天切腳,一天六、七、八個,有時一週廿多個!醫院外槍聲不斷!」

柯彼得回憶說,戰爭實在是很「有趣」的事,在槍林彈雨中,他與醫院同仁的關係卻異常的緊密,每週與兩位澳籍醫師、兩位澳籍護理人員到金邊開會,內心有些不安全感,並且隨時注意各式小道消息,後來醫師只剩他一人,便由他負起教學的工作,指導柬籍醫學院的學生行醫。

當時他的女朋友、後來的妻子,在台東聖母醫院擔任翻譯的王媛玲,特地從台北轉機至泰國曼谷,再轉機至越南胡志明市,再飛到柬埔寨來看他,這個遠道而來的探訪讓柯彼得倍極感動,當柬埔寨的工作一結束,「台灣」理所當然成為他的下一個目的地。

擁有如此洋洋灑灑的資歷,柯彼得卻不以此自滿,他在柬埔寨戰火稍歇的時刻,利用燭光讀書,為的是參加英國內科專科醫師執照(MRCP)的考試。

「我在尚比亞行醫時認識了一位英國醫師,他是一位內科專科醫師,卻在外科、眼科手術醫術精湛,成為我心目中想仿傚的典範。」縱使如此,第一部份的筆試柯彼得仍考了三次;考過才能考第二試,但這部份也是最難的,因為必須實際看病,問診後做出臨床的判斷。

「我在第二試一共看了九個病人,其他考生只看了三個,我心想,病看太快,可能考糟了!事後才知道,因為在尚比亞與柬埔寨沒有精密醫療儀器協助情況下,練就了豐富的臨床經驗,口試委員當場就決定讓我過關,還盡量送病人給我看!」柯彼得解釋。

心靈伴侶,不再獨行

年輕時受不了澳洲沒有高山,每年都要去「隔壁」的紐西蘭攀登第一高峰庫克山,柯彼得壓抑不了內心蠢蠢欲動的壯遊欲望,在行醫之餘,1994年開始連續九年,到聖母峰登山健行,但他不再踽踽獨行,而是帶著妻子王媛玲一起去。「她可能是台灣少數去過聖母峰這麼多次的女性哦!」

柯彼得志不在登頂,而在行醫貢獻專業之餘,又能享受爬山的樂趣。2002年他甚至在聖母峰海拔4,500公尺半山腰的小診所,擔任三個月的義工醫師。「有什麼比在看病的地方,每天可以看到壯闊連綿的高山群還高興的事呢?」

經驗豐富的他,可以從聖母峰登山的行程中預測會不會得高山症。柯彼得解釋,人超過海拔2,500公尺的高度,身體容易缺氧,因此連續四天晚上睡眠的高度不要超過1,000公尺,讓身體適應高海拔的環境,就不易引發高山症。柯彼得很自豪地說:「只要經過他指點的登山客,沒有人罹患高山症。」

聖母峰的小診所裡有一個小烤箱,柯太太用鳳梨罐頭做鳳梨蛋糕,由於小診所並非攻頂的必經路線,但聽到有蛋糕吃,吸引了許多有名的登山客專程繞路「慕」蛋糕而來。「所以我見過很多有名的登山客,例如第一個沒有用氧氣筒攻上聖母峰的Peter Habeler,以及第一個登上世界第四高峰洛子峰的美國人Wally Berg。」

2002年柯彼得轉到台東基督教醫院,急診加上門診,一個人當1.5個醫師用。這麼操勞,柯彼得還會向醫院請數月的長假,到破冰遊輪擔任船醫,連續五年帶著太太王媛玲去南、北極圈與阿拉斯加做極地探險。

柯彼得解釋這非比尋常的經歷:「我最後一次在印度北部攀登一座6,000公尺的山,沿途遇到一位在藥廠工作的美國人。你知道,同行一段路,聊聊天,有時還會互相留下email。沒有想到三個月後,我收到這個美國人的email,他向全世界經營北極最大遊輪公司的執行長推薦我,因為每艘到南、北極圈的破冰遊輪都規定要有醫師同行,於是我賺到免費的船票,而且是兩張票。我喜歡跟太太在一起,當然要帶她一起去,我坐過各式各樣不同的破冰船,包括全球最大核子動力的破冰船。」

巡迴偏鄉,填補缺口

「回到台灣就覺得很歡喜,台灣什麼都好,這裡是天堂。」柯彼得很納悶:「許多台灣人都不懂,台灣風景好,又非常安全,不像澳洲很多吸毒的人偷了東西,再賣到二手市集去,台灣很少有二手市集可以銷贓。」

2008年莫拉克風災,南迴鐵、公路對外交通中斷,部落孤立無援,柯彼得與台東基督教醫院的醫療團隊搭直升機進入達仁鄉土坂村進行緊急醫療救援,貼心關懷災民的需要,也提供及時的幫助與安慰。

然而,經常出入救援的前線,柯彼得也有受難的經驗。2009年全球爆發H1N1疫情,從紐約返抵國門的他,因為發燒,篩檢結果處於陽性與陰性的邊緣地帶,謹慎的疾管局人員決定隔離,成為台灣境外移入H1N1新型流感的首例病例。接機的太太王媛玲十分擔心,跟著跳上救護車,成為第二例。事過境遷,成為難忘的回憶。

台東基督教醫院為了讓台東罹癌的民眾擺脫「趕路比治病還苦」的窘境,正在籌資興建癌症醫療大樓,目前還缺5,000多萬元的經費。

柯彼得醫師卻拋出更深的憂慮說,硬體醫院容易建,但真正的問題是要有醫師願意留在偏鄉。許多醫師都是來了二、三年就走。雖然台灣的健保制度非常好,而且公平,不論有錢、沒有錢,都可以接受有品質的治療。但病人小病上大醫院,專科醫師的訓練愈來愈窄,例如一個小感冒看心臟科,說不準醫師會做心導管,就像美國小說家馬克吐溫說的,手上拿了鐵鎚,任何事物看起來就像釘子。

總是一派輕鬆的柯彼得醫師,說到台灣健保制度美中不足之處,表情跟著嚴肅起來:「要改變這樣的問題,應學習國外的制度,讓第一線的家庭醫師可以看簡單的婦科、外科,重病才到大醫院,才能避免醫療資源的浪費。」

生命低潮,努力走過

想要成為台灣公民,一直是柯彼得的願望,尤其剛到台灣時,每年都得要換居留證,他總會擔心不會通過。雖然2004年拿到永久居留身分,但不是台灣公民,不只不能投票,對繼承等相關法律的保障還是不一樣。

他舉了一個極端的例子說:「假設我犯罪被判刑一年,如果沒有拿到身分證,出獄後馬上會被遣返離境,不能再回台灣;但有了身分證,只要去坐牢一年,出來了,還可以回到我的家與所親愛家人身邊。」

柯彼得所謂的家,是他親自設計,從一片荒地興建起富有villa風味的建築。15歲起,就著迷製作Cutty Sark號古老商船迷你版的模型,可以說是手作高手,屋內連床架、櫥櫃、餐椅與手工檯燈都由他親手製作。牆壁上掛滿色彩鮮明的油畫,畫家正是這對神仙眷侶遍遊極地高山,回到台灣閒暇之餘的作品。

因此當內政部修改國籍法,並且肯定曾獲得第11屆醫療奉獻獎、在偏鄉行醫30年的柯彼得對台灣的貢獻,在2017年核准他歸化台灣國籍。拿到台灣的身分證,柯彼得非常高興:「我的生命與生活都在這裡,我是台灣人,我是台東都蘭人!」

2018年間王媛玲騎車出去工作時意外發生車禍,撒手人寰。這個突如其來的意外,讓他沒有機會說再見,但也因為柯彼得具備台灣公民的身分,一切財產繼承等問題不致因身分而有遺憾。

問柯醫師還OK嗎?柯醫師小聲地說:「不OK!總感覺生活裡缺少了什麼!」但他話鋒一轉,很快地說出正面的話:「我還可以騎腳踏車,還要做家具,每天很忙呢!」

オーストラリアから台湾へ

医師・柯彼得(ピーター・ケンリック)

文・曾蘭淑 写真・林旻萱 翻訳・山口 雪菜

台東キリスト教病院救急科主任の柯彼得(ピーター・ケンリック)は、かつてカンボジアの戦場やイランのクルド人難民キャンプ、ザンビアの田舎などで医療に従事していた。世界各地で働いてきた動機を聞くと「Just for fun!」と答える。

後にたまたま台湾を訪れ、この山と水に恵まれた台東が終の棲家となった。ここにきて34年、「私は台湾人、台東の都蘭人です」と言う。


「知者は水を楽しみ、仁者は山を楽しむ」と言う。この日、柯彼得医師と待ち合わせたのは、海岸山脈南の最高峰である都蘭山だ。登山口に立つと、遠く太平洋の先に緑島と蘭嶼がくっきりと見える。自転車に乗ってきた彼は滝のような汗を流し、息を弾ませている。背が高く痩せ型の彼は精確な中国語で「4.2キロずっと登ってきました。傾斜は平均13.9%、38分かかりました」

アミ族とプユマ族が聖なる山と呼ぶ都蘭山は、61歳の柯彼得のジムと言えそうだ。かつてツール・ド・フランスのコースであるピレネー山脈も自転車で走ったことがある彼は、「都蘭山はピレネー山脈より3〜4倍も難しいですよ」と言う。

オーストラリアのメルボルンで生まれた柯彼得は、1985年にイギリスで帰国の準備をしていた時、台東聖母病院の医師募集の広告を目にした。試用期間2ヶ月とある。台湾はイギリスからオーストラリアへのちょうど「中間」に位置するのだから寄ってみようと思い、これがきっかけで台東で34年を過ごすこととなった。

たまたま来た台東

彼は「運が良かった」と言う。台湾に到着するや、すぐに山と海の美しい台東へ行ったからだ。もし台北にとどまっていたら、とっくに台湾を後にしていたかもしれないと言う。

台湾に来る前は、サウジアラビアとザンビアでの医療に従事していた。

彼はレジデントの初年度にサウジアラビア勤務となった。待遇は良かったが一年でもう十分だと思った。「極端に保守的なイスラム国家は『異常』です。くだらない話をしてはならないし、女の人を見ることもできない。もし女の人をじろじろ見たら、それは女性側の問題とされ、彼女の方が責められるのです!」

その後、彼は国際赤十字に入り、ザンビアの病院に派遣された。100床もある病院だが、医師は4人しかおらず、運ばれてくるのは腹膜炎や難産の妊婦、衛生状態が悪いための腸閉塞などの重症患者ばかりだった。患者数も多く、毎週100時間以上働かなければならず、給与は支払われず、生活費も自分でねん出しなければならない。「資金もほぼ使い切ってしまいました。それが、台湾に来たら何でもあって、毎月2万元の給与ももらえるのです」と柯彼得は笑顔でその差を語る。

15歳から自転車を始めた彼は、一回で100キロも走る。台湾に来てからは台東の先住民集落をつなぐ険しい山道が彼のお気に入りのコースとなった。聖母病院での診察の他は、看護師で麻酔も学んだシスターのパトリシア・アイコックとともに各地の集落を診察してまわった。当時はまだ国民健康保険がなく、医療費を支払えない患者は無料で診察した。

世界各地での診療

1988年、柯彼得は再び国際赤十字によって内戦中のカンボジアへ送られた。そこでは毎日、肺炎や脳膜炎、マラリアなどの患者の他に、地雷によって足の切断を余儀なくされた多くの兵士を診た。「多い時には、毎日のように7人も8人も足を切断しなければならず、病院の外では銃声が絶えませんでした」と言う。

当時の彼の恋人で後の妻、台東聖母病院で通訳を担当していた王媛玲は、台北からバンコク経由でホーチミンへ行き、そこからさらにカンボジアまで飛んで彼に会いに来た。柯彼得は感動し、カンボジアでの仕事が終わるや、当然のごとく「台湾」が彼の目的地となった。

柯彼得はその素晴らしい経歴を自慢することはないが、カンボジアでは戦火の中、仕事の合間に蝋燭の光で勉強した。イギリスの内科専門医の資格(MRCP)試験を受けるためだ。

「ザンビアで診療していた時にイギリス人の医師と出会いました。その人は内科専門医なのに、外科や眼科の手術も見事にこなし、私にとっての目標となったのです」と言う。懸命に勉強したが、最初の筆記試験は3回目でようやく合格。続く二次試験は、実際に病人を診察し、問診だけで臨床的判断を下すというものだった。

「二次試験で私は9人の患者を診ましたが、他の受験者は3人しか診なかったのです。私は患者1人にかける時間が短すぎたため、不合格になるのではないかと思いました」ところが後から分かったのだが、彼はザンビアやカンボジアで精密機器がない状況で多くの患者を診てきたので、臨床経験が豊富になっていたのである。

若い頃の柯彼得はオーストラリアに高山がないのが不満で、毎年となりのニュージーランドの最高峰クック山へ行っていた。山への思いが募り、1994年から9年間、医師としての仕事の合間にエベレスト登山を続けた。だが、この時は一人ではなく、妻の王媛玲も一緒だ。「台湾でエベレストにこれほど何度も行ったことのある女性は彼女ぐらいでしょう」と言う。

心の伴侶を得て

柯彼得は登山家を目指しているのではなく、医療の合間に山に登るのが楽しみなのである。2002年にはエベレストの標高4500メートル地点にある診療所で3ヶ月にわたってボランティア診療を行なった。「高山が見えるところで診療できることほどうれしいことはありません」

この診療所には小さなオーブンがあり、王媛玲はパイナップルの缶詰を使ってケーキを焼いた。診療所はエベレスト登山のルート上ではないが、ケーキが食べられるというので多くの著名な登山家がわざわざ訪ねてきた。例えば、初のエベレスト無酸素登頂を果たしたピーター・ハーベラーや、エベレストに連なる世界第四高峰のローツェ初登頂に成功したワリー・バーグらである。

2002年、柯彼得は台東キリスト教病院に移り、救急・外来担当として1.5人分働いた。それでも病院に長期休暇を申請し、砕氷船の船内医としても勤務してきた。妻を連れて5年連続、南極圏や北極圏、アラスカなどの極地を巡った。「私は妻と一緒にいるのが好きなので、彼女を連れていきました。さまざまな砕氷船に乗り、世界最大の原子力砕氷船にも乗りました」と言う。

「台湾に戻るとうれしくなります。台湾は何もかもすばらしくて、天国ですよ。それなのに多くの台湾人はそれに気づいていません。景色もよく、安全です。オーストラリアのように薬物中毒の人が盗みをはたらき、中古品市場で売りさばくこともありません。台湾には中古品マーケットがあまりありませんから」と言う。

2008年の台風8号(モーラコット)による八八水害では、南廻の鉄道と道路が被害に遭い、多くの先住民集落が外部との交通手段を失って孤立してしまった。柯彼得と台東キリスト教病院の医療団はヘリで達仁郷土坂村に飛び、緊急医療救援を行ない、災害直後に被災者のニーズに応え、住民の心を支えた。

台東キリスト教病院は、台東のがん患者が治療のために苦労して病院通いをしなくて済むよう、がん治療病棟建設のための資金を集めており、目標まであと5000万元となっている。

だが、柯彼得はより深刻な課題を指摘する。病院施設の建設は容易だが、問題は僻遠地域での医療に携わろうという医師が集まるかどうかなのである。これまでも多くの医師が2〜3年で去っていった。台湾の国民皆保険制度は非常によくできていて公平だ。お金のあるなしにかかわらず、誰もが質の高い治療を受けられる。しかし、患者は小さな病気でも大病院へ行きたがり、医師の専門分野も細分化が進んでいる。例えば、ただの風邪なのに循環器科の医師に診てもらったりすると、その医師の専門は心臓カテーテルで、その専門的視野からしか診られない可能性もあるのだ。

常にマイペースの柯彼得だが、台湾の健保制度の課題について語り始めると表情は厳しくなる。「このような問題を解決するには海外に学ばなければなりません。第一線の『かかりつけ医』が簡単な婦人科や外科の治療もできるようにし、重症患者だけが大病院に行くようにしなければ、医療資源の浪費は避けられません」と語る。

苦しみを乗り越えて

台湾に帰化することは、以前から柯彼得の願いだった。特に台湾に来たばかりのころは、毎年居留証を更新しなければならず、そのたびに更新が認められないのではないかと心配していた。2004年に彼は永久居留証を取得したが、それは国民の待遇ではない。選挙権もなければ、相続などにおいても国民とは待遇が異なるのである。

都蘭の柯彼得の家は自ら設計したもので、荒れ野原にヴィラ風の建物を建てた。15歳の頃から帆船カティサーク号の模型作りが好きだった彼は、DIYの名人でもある。ベッドからキャビネット、ダイニングテーブルやライトまで彼の手作りなのだ。壁にかけられた色彩豊かな油絵も、世界を旅する合間に彼が描いたものだ。

政府内政部が国籍法を改正したこと、そして30年に渡って僻遠地域で医療を行なってきたことが評価され第11回医療貢献賞を受賞し、柯彼得は2017年に台湾国籍への帰化が認められた。台湾の身分証を手にした時は非常にうれしかったという。「私の人生も生活もここにあるのですから、私は台湾人であり、台東の都蘭人です」

2018年、王媛玲はバイクで仕事に行き、交通事故で世を去った。あまりに突然のことで、彼は別れの言葉を言う機会さえなかったが、台湾の国民である柯彼得は、国籍の違いによる相続などのトラブルに遭うことはなかった。

「大丈夫ですか」と問うと、「大丈夫じゃないですよ。いつも何かが欠けている感じがします」と答える。だが、すぐに話題を変え、ポジティブにこう話す。「でも自転車にも乗れますし、家具も作れますから、毎日忙しいですよ」と。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!