Hukuisu Restaurant

Rejuvenating a Colonial-Era Gastronomic Icon
:::

2018 / November

Sanya Huang /photos courtesy of Lin Min-hsuan /tr. by Bruce Humes


“As soon as the decorated lanterns were hung, a constant flow of brightly attired highly placed officials, influential personalities, and well-connected geishas from Tai­nan’s Shin­ma­chi pleasure quarters arrived by rickshaw at the entrance. Although Hu­kuisu was classified as a ryo­tei-style Japanese restaurant, in reality it played the role of a major underground decision-making center in Tai­nan during the ­Showa Era and as such was intimately connected with the city’s modern-day historical development.” —Tai­nan City Cultural Affairs Bureau

 


 

In his Diary of Mr. Guan­yuan, Lin ­Hsien-tang, a pioneer of the movement for greater Taiwanese autonomy under Japanese rule, describes a freewheeling mealtime conversation with friends held in 1930 when visiting Tai­nan: “…visited the Tai­nan Exhibition Hall. Then took lunch at the Hu­kuisu restaurant. [Liu] Ming­zhe invited [Wang] ­Shoulu and [Han] Shi­quan to join us, and we discussed religion for over an hour….”     

Eateries bridging cultural barriers

Founded in 1912, Hu­kuisu was a luxurious ryo­tei-style dining venue in Tai­nan during Japanese rule. Due to its proximity to the prefecture’s administrative headquarters, it was dubbed the “underground decision-making center.” Having suffered a long period of abandonment, disputes over whether it should be preserved or demolished, devastation by the forces of nature, and an awkward repositioning as a cultural asset, in 2018—more than a century later—it reopened its doors to diners.

In his ­Meiji-mura on Paper: The Demolished Classic Buildings of Taiwan, cultural scholar Lin ­Tzung-kuei lists Hu­kuisu and Tai­pei’s Ki­shu An Forest of Literature as two buildings dedicated to dining that embody the especially rich historical ambience of Taiwan under Japanese rule. Although Hu­kuisu lacked the riverside beauty of Ki­shu An, the former excelled with its purely Japanese garden landscaping that hinted at Zen and ­Shinto philosophical thought. A leisurely stroll allowed for contemplation and relaxation, making it an ideal place for socializing and political gossip.

In the north there is Ki­shu An, and in the south is Hu­kuisu. Each represents a ­Showa-era colonial dining space that transcended the gap between two cultures. Their fates were similar; both form part of the imprint left behind by the Japanese when colonial rule ended in 1945.

Bumpy road to rebirth

After World War II, both sites reverted to the public sector. Ki­shu An served as a dormitory for civil servants, but the main building and annex suffered a massive fire, and only the banquet hall escaped unscathed. Hu­kuisu functioned for a while as a dormitory for Tai­nan First Senior High School, but a typhoon in 2008 badly damaged the main structure. The remaining unutilized wooden­-framed building was gradually neglected, and local residents even demanded its demolition. In recent years, however, with the rise of the “spatial native language” movement, which advocates using traditional cultural elements as components for new architectural design, the importance of these two examples of classical Japanese-era architecture has gradually been recognized by groups fighting for the preservation of folk culture. They have requested that these buildings be protected as part of our cultural heritage.

In 2004, the faculty and students of National Taiwan University Graduate Institute of Building and Planning proposed to the Tai­pei City Department of Culture Affairs that Ki­shu An’s banquet hall be officially designated as a Municipal Historic Site. That same year, the Tai­nan City Cultural Affairs Bureau convened the Monument and Historical Building Review Committee, and Hu­kuisu won designation as a Tai­nan Historic Site in 2005. However, due to flaws in the administrative process, it was disqualified in 2006. In 2009, Tai­nan classified Hu­kuisu as a landscape installation, and landscaped the site in a way intended to give a sense of the original ambience, while retaining parts of the original structure. It was reopened to the public at the end of 2013.   

Steps to freeing up space

Due to urban planning and building regulations, the uses that the renovated Hu­kuisu could be put to were limited. To resolve this issue, the Tai­nan Cultural Affairs Bureau began by revising local legislation. In 2014 it formulated rules for setting up review panels for commemorative buildings, and then drew up regulations for approving their renovation or reconstruction. Finally, the Hu­kuisu site was rezoned as “land for public education,” thereby loosening restrictions on building a new structure on land previously designated for a plaza.

Via this three-part solution—dubbed the “Hu­kuisu Provisions”—Hu­kuisu’s wooden-framed building was ­designated as Tai­nan’s first commemorative ­building in 2015. In 2016, the operating rights to the remains of the white structure located immediately opposite the entrance were obtained by A-Sha Restaurant, itself renowned throughout Taiwan as the dining venue “frequented by the most presidents.” Renovations began in 2017 and were completed in 2018. At a cost of NT$10 million, this structure was converted into a two-story building fusing the old and the new. It has been dubbed “Eagle Hill” by A-Sha’s head chef Wu ­Chien Hao, great-nephew of the restaurant’s founder.

For Wu, who grew up in a lane off ­Zhongyi Street, Hu­kuisu is an organic part of daily life. How to make this culinary brand shine once again and attract more people to take part in its revival has become a personal challenge.

In a tribute to Hu­kuisu’s eel don­buri of yesteryear, Wu combines the restaurant’s signature sticky rice cake with specially prepared eel, and wraps it in shell ginger leaves to form a steamed fan­tuan (rice ball). From the 90-year-old Chinese chestnut tree in the courtyard garden he picks the fruit—“phoenix eyes”—to make seasonal chestnut glutinous rice cakes that are both mouthwatering and visually pleasing.

When it comes to the details of the refurbishment, Wu has endless tales to tell: at the first-floor entrance, the reception desk and floor feature traditional ya­ga­suri patterns that evoke arrow feathers, while the avian­-themed lighting fixtures on the second story and the bird shapes at the end of the sloping roof trusses are all modeled on the Japanese bush warbler (the name Hu­kuisu comes from ­uguisu, the bird’s Japanese name).

Eagle Hill evinces Hu­kuisu’s cross-cultural gourmet spirit and attracts visitors to venture inside its fusion of new and old. As they wander about, they can tour the Japanese-style courtyard and buildings, encounter musical performances and tea parties, nibble on chestnut cake, sip white wax-apple herb tea, sit under the veranda eaves listening to the patter of raindrops, or enjoy the lantern-lit courtyard at night. A new cultural bright spot in the city, the renovated Hu­kuisu brings Taiwan’s cultural history alive once again.                                 

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

繁體 日本語

鶯料理

跨文化飲食建築更生記

文‧黃淑姿 圖‧林旻萱

「華燈初上,門前川流不息的人力車載來衣著光鮮的達官顯要,及自新町轉介而來的藝妓。『鶯料理』雖是料亭酒家,實則扮演著昭和年間台南地區地下決策中心的重要角色,與府城近代的歷史發展息息相關。」(台南市政府文化局)

 


 

台灣民族運動先驅林獻堂曾在他的《灌園先生日記》裡寫下,於昭和5年(1930)南下台南訪友時,「……次觀商品陳列館。次到鶯料理店午餐,明哲招受祿、石泉來陪,議論宗教一時餘……」描述在鶯料理與友人用餐暢談的過程。鶯料理創辦人天野久吉的好廚藝,與「一筆料理」的勇野鶴太郎並稱為日治時期台南料理界「兩把刀」,尤其是頂尖刀工做出的鮮美鰻魚飯,備受歡迎,讓它成為當時饕客名流雲集的重要社交場所。

突破文化隔閡的飲食建築

創建於1912年的鶯料理,是日治時期台南高級的料理亭,因鄰近行政中心而被稱為「地下決策中心」,在經歷荒廢多年、存廢爭議、風災重創與一度尷尬的文化資產定位後,百年後的2018年重新開門見客,遙遙呼應當年風華。

台南資深文獻委員黃天橫指出,當年「鶯料理是高官顯要或紅頂商人聚集場所,高檔懷石料理一套起碼8元,而當時一般大眾食堂的咖哩飯也才幾角而已。」

文化研究者凌宗魁在《紙上明治村》中,將鶯料理與紀州庵並列為台灣日治時代兩座饒富歷史情懷的飲食建築。鶯料理雖無紀州庵的河濱美景,勝在純日本風情的庭園造景,隱含禪宗和神道哲學思想,讓人漫步其中、沈思放鬆,正適合交換與吸收政治情報訊息。

北有紀州庵,南有鶯料理,作為以食物跨越文化隔閡的台灣日治昭和時代餐飲空間代表,紀州庵與鶯料理的命運極為相似,是飲食建築,也是日本在殖民台灣時期留下的文化印記。

坎坷的重生之路

二次戰後同被公部門接收,紀州庵曾為省政府公務員宿舍,1990年代本館與別館遭大火燒毀,只剩離屋;鶯料理一度作為台南一中宿舍,2008年颱風來襲,建築本體嚴重受創。僅存的建物,後來因閒置而逐漸荒廢,還遭到當地居民要求拆除,但在近年用傳統文化元素,做為新建築設計素材的台灣空間母語運動興起後,逐漸受到民間文化保存團體重視,要求列為文化資產保存的對象。

2004年,台大城鄉所師生成功向台北市文化局提報紀州庵離屋為市定古蹟;同年,台南市文化局召開古蹟暨歷史建築審查委員會,鶯料理通過審查,在2005年被指定為市立古蹟,但卻因過程瑕疵,又在2006年遭撤銷資格。2009年台南市政府重新將鶯料理定為景觀設施,以意象復原的方式整修,保留殘餘的局部構造,於2013年年底完成修復,開放參觀。

三部曲解開空間封印

受限於都市計劃與建築法令,鶯料理的空間再造利用功能有限,訪客僅能靜態參觀建築、庭園及中棟展出的原鶯料理文物,與「鶯料理應該有料理」的期待大相逕庭。

為突破困境,台南市文化局先從修法做起。首先於2014年訂定《台南市政府紀念性建築物審議小組設置要點》,再制定《台南市紀念性建築物修復或重建許可規定》,最後將鶯料理土地都市計畫變更為「社教用地」,鬆綁廣場用地無法加蓋新建物的限制。

透過「鶯料理條款」的三部曲解套,使鶯料理的「裡棟」木構造主體在2015年被指定為全台南市第一處紀念性建築;殘存白色遺構的「表棟」,2016由被喻為全台「最多總統到訪」的阿霞飯店取得經營權,並於2017年開工,2018年改建完成,耗資千萬將表棟改建為新舊融合的兩層建築,由一手主導的阿霞飯店第4代吳健豪,將之命名為「鷲嶺食肆」,隱含位於海拔44公尺的諧音寓意,於修復完成後捐贈給台南市政府,並認養原鶯料理建築物、庭園作為展示、參觀與展演的公共空間,期待能打造出台南人文景觀的新亮點。

打造台南人文新亮點

對從小在忠義街巷子裡長大的吳健豪來說,鶯料理是生活的一部分,如何重新擦亮鶯料理的招牌,吸引更多人參與它的重生,也成為吳健豪的挑戰。

除了改建表棟的硬體建設,最好的方式,自然是用美食吸引訪客,吳健豪以特製鰻魚結合飯店招牌米糕,用月桃葉包裹成飯糰,向當年鶯料理的招牌鰻魚飯致敬;摘取庭園中90歲蘋婆樹的果子,製成季節限定的蘋婆米糕,別緻有趣也鮮美可口。「我還試過用蘋婆製成蒙布朗,口感、顏色都非常像,可惜有些人無法接受蘋婆果的味道,只好放棄。」吳健豪不無遺憾地說。

身為飯店主廚的吳健豪,擁有十足料理熱情與創意,也是長輩口中的叛逆小子,堅持提案競標,拿下鶯料理的經營權,明知獲利不易,仍極力邀請專精古建築修復的張玉璜打造表棟,預算更從一開始400萬追加到1,000萬,「頭都洗了,就洗到底。」吳健豪指著改建細節,有說不完的故事:一樓進門,服務台與地板的羽紋造型,二樓的鳥類燈飾、屋架斜樑端部的鳥體造型,處處呼應「鶯」的鳥族意象。

當鷲嶺食肆領現著鶯料理的美食跨文化精神,吸引訪客走入新舊融合的空間,走動著參觀庭園、建築,音樂會、茶會,吃一塊蘋婆米糕,喝一口白蓮霧茶,雨天時坐在廊簷下聽雨,黑夜時在庭院欣賞燈景……讓鶯料理成為台南人文新亮點,再一次活化歷史。                                       

日本時代の料亭建築

「鶯料理」の再利用

文・黃淑姿 写真・林旻萱 翻訳・山口 雪菜

「ネオンが灯る頃、門前を絶え間なく行き交う人力車が立派な出で立ちの要人や、新町の芸者を載せてくる。『鶯料理』は料亭だが、実際には昭和の時代の台南で、影の政策決定の場と呼ばれており、台南府城の近代史に重要な役割を果たしていた」(台南市政府文化局)


台湾民族運動の先駆者である林献堂は昭和5年(1930年)に台南の友人を訪ねた時のことを『灌園先生日記』にこう書いている。「…商品陳列館を見学した後、鶯料理店で昼食をとる。明哲は受禄と石泉を誘って同席させ、ひととき宗教について論じあった…」

「鶯料理」創設者である天野久吉と「一筆料理」の勇野鶴太郎の料理の腕は、日本統治時代の台南料理界で一二を争う存在だった。鶯料理は特に鰻で知られ、当時の要人の社交の場所として知られていた。

文化の垣根を越える料亭建築

1912年に建設された鶯料理は、日本統治時代の台南の高級料亭で、行政府の近くにあったことから「影の政策決定の場」と呼ばれた。その後、料亭は放置されて荒廃し、その存廃が議論され、台風の被害にも遭い、文化遺産とされた後、100年の時を経てかつての華やぎを取り戻し、2018年に再び客を招き入れるようになった。

台南の文献委員である黄天横によると、当時は「鶯料理は政府高官や富裕層が集まる場所で、高級懐石料理は安いもので8元以上でした。当時、一般の大衆食堂のカレーライスが数銭という時代です」と言う。

文化研究者の凌宗魁は『紙上明治村』の中で、日本統治時代の歴史的料亭建築として「鶯料理」と「紀州庵」の二つを挙げている。鶯料理は紀州庵のような河岸の景色はないものの、その純日本風の庭園は禅宗と神道の哲学思想を感じさせ、そこを歩くと心が落ち着き、確かに政治情報を交換する場にふさわしい。

北の紀州庵に南の鶯料理。文化の隔たりを、食をもって乗り越えた日本統治時代の料亭空間だが、紀州庵と鶯料理がたどった運命も似ている。料亭建築であり、また日本が植民地に残した文化の記憶なのである。

再生までの厳しい道のり

紀州庵は第二次世界大戦後に公的部門に接収され、台湾省政府の公務員官舎となり、1990年には本館と別館が大火に見舞われ、離れだけが残った。一方の鶯料理は、一度は台南一中の宿舎となり、2008年の台風で建物本体が深刻なダメージを負った。残った建物も放置されて荒れ果て、近隣住民から取り壊しの要求が出された。そうした中、近年は伝統文化の要素を新建築設計の素材にするという台湾空間母語運動が盛んになり、文化保存団体の目を引いて、文化遺産として保存対象にすべきだという要求が出始めた。

2004年、台湾大学建築城郷研究所の教員と学生が台北市文化局に紀州庵の離れを古跡に指定することを提案した。同年、台南市文化局は古跡および歴史建築審査委員会を開き、鶯料理は審査を経て2005年に市の古跡に指定された。ところが、その過程に瑕疵があったことから2006年に古跡の資格を取り消されてしまった。2009年、台南市はあらためて鶯料理を景観施設に指定し、イメージ復元の方式で修復した。一部残っている構造を活かす形で2013年末に修復が終わり、一般の見学に開放したのである。

空間の封印を解く

この時点では都市計画や建築関連法規による制限があって鶯料理の空間再利用には限界があり、来訪者は庭園や展示物を見ることしかできなかった。鶯料理から想像される美食を期待することはできなかったのである。

この限界を突破するために、台南市文化局は条例改正から着手した。2014年に「台南市政府記念性建築物審議小組設置要点」を定め、さらに「台南市記念性建築物修復または再建許可規定」を定め、最後に鶯料理の土地を都市計画における「社会教育用地」に変更することで、「広場用地」には新たな建物は建てられないとする制限を受けないようにしたのである。

この三段階にわたる「鶯料理条項」により、鶯料理の「裡棟」と呼ばれる木造建築が2015年に台南市初の「記念性建築」に指定され、白い遺構だけが残っていた「表棟」は、「最も多くの総統が訪れた」と言われる阿霞飯店が2016年に経営権を取得した。そして2017年に着工、2018年に修築が終わり、表棟は1000万元をかけて新旧を融合させた二階建ての建物へと生まれ変わった。これを手掛けた阿霞飯店四代目の呉健豪は、これを「鷲嶺食肆」と名付けた。「鷲嶺食肆」としたのは「海抜44メートル」と発音が似ているからで、修築した建物は台南市に寄贈し、鶯料理の建物と庭園をアドプトして展示や展覧会ができるパブリックスペースとした。これを台南の文化的景観として新たなスポットにしたいと考えている。

台南の新たな文化スポットに

幼い頃から忠義街の路地で育った呉健豪にとって、鶯料理はもともと生活の一部であった。いかに多くの人の参画を促し、この鶯料理の看板を立て直すかが、彼のチャレンジとなった。

建物の他に、最も有効な方法は食である。呉建豪は、かつて鶯料理の看板料理だった鰻の蒲焼と阿霞飯店の看板である「おこわ」を結び付け、それを桃の葉で包んでおにぎりとすることにした。また、庭園にある樹齢90年のピンポンノキの実を使った季節限定の「ピンポンノキおこわ」もおいしい。「ピンポンノキの実でモンブランも作ってみました。色もきれいでおいしかったのですが、クセがあって口に合わないという人もいて、あきらめざるを得ませんでした」と言う。

料理店の主である呉健豪は、料理に対する情熱と創意にあふれている。利益を出すのは非常に難しいと分かっていながら入札に参加し、古民家修復を専門とする張玉؟Xに表棟の修復を依頼した。予算も当初の400万から1000万に増えたが、乗りかかった舟、と完成まで頑張った。

呉健豪は、建物の細部には言い尽くせない物語があると言う。入り口のカウンターと床の羽の模様や2階の鳥の形の照明、天井の鳥の造形など、いたるところに「鶯」が散りばめられている。

鷲嶺食肆は鶯料理の美食文化の精神を受け継ぎ、新旧が融合した空間に来訪者を招き入れる。そして庭園や建築物の間を歩きながら、音楽会や茶会を楽しみ、名物のおこわを食べ、白蓮霧茶を飲む。雨の日は軒下に座って雨だれの音を聞き、夜は庭園の灯りを愛でる。鶯料理は台南の新たなスポットとなり、歴史空間が再現された。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!