Crafty Fashion: Giving Taiwanese Manufacturing a Voice Through Design

:::

2017 / 11月

文‧Lynn Su 圖‧Lin Min-hsuan


Designers are often faced with the question of how to balance personal creativity with commerce. Tai­chung makes that balancing act a bit easier. Its relatively low rents and labor costs, and Tai­pei-comparable competitive pressures, make it more accommodating to experimental spaces, enticing young designers to build their businesses there. These young creatives are renting apartments in the city, opening unique creative and cultural businesses, and connecting with and encouraging one another.


The Taiwanese expression “hang-a-lai” refers to an expert, someone who is in the know. It’s an apt name for Tai­chung’s creative and cultural industry hotspots. Centered around the National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts, the hang-a-lai areas include the city’s West District and its Da­rong Street commercial district. Creative and cultural enterprises ranging from private chefs to art galleries, coffee shops, studios, and boutiques dot the surrounding lowrise residential neighborhoods, giving rise to something very much like a mini creative‡cultural platform. Happy surprises lurk around every bend.

Personal ties

Huang Milu, the owner of PetitDeer Curatorial Studio and a frequent curator of fairs and exhibitions, says, “People from Tai­chung are grounded and stubborn. If you want to put down roots in the city, you’re better off developing relationships than flashing titles and certifications.”

Less highly commercialized than Tai­pei, the city’s makeup retains traces of traditional village culture. And while Tai­pei’s creative and cultural workers often go it alone, those in Tai­chung for the long haul have to take the time to weave extensive interpersonal networks that will not only provide them with information and resources, but also facilitate cooperation.

Tracing the threads of these interpersonal connections reveals the patterns in the fabric of the city’s creative and cultural industry.

Rita Ho and Reean Jan used to work together at a Tai­chung shoe manufacturer, where their duties coordinating with OEM customers and raw materials suppliers gave them a thorough grasp of the shoemaking process. After the company announced its closure, the two women went on to establish Laney Shoes in 2014. Chen Yun­han, manager of the Art Museum Parkway commercial district association, helped them arrange to share a storefront on Wu­quan 8th Street with leather-goods maker Sen­sia­shu, giving rise to a leather studio with a rich array of products.

Maggie ­Chang, founder of Vingt Six, produced her first shoulder bag, one shaped like a skirt and featuring a soft exterior and firm interior, to meet her own needs. She went on to open a stall, take the bag to market, and forge connections with other young designers in her field. The young designers shared ideas and information among themselves, and then rented a studio together. Their friendly relationship and mutual support eventually led to ­Chang selling her products overseas, and, in 2016, opening a designer boutique: O.Office. 

Giving a myth the boot

Central Taiwan has long been the heartland of Taiwanese manufacturing. Back in the heyday of Taiwanese OEM manufacturing, the area was filled with leather, fabric and hardware makers generating large amounts of income from abroad. Though most of these producers have since moved overseas, a few remain and continue to provide a variety of items and high-quality materials at low cost. These products not only save the young designers and their brands money, but also get their creative juices flowing. The manufacturers themselves offer them still another resource: the deep understanding of production methods that their older workers possess. Access to these workers enables young designers with contemporary sensibilities to further the development of traditional crafts and involves young people in keeping these crafts alive. The clothing and shoes they help make contain echoes of the manufacturing glory days of yore.

Ho named her brand “Laney” to evoke a sense of the “insidery” nature of the craft‡design field. She and her peers operate micro-brands characterized by their sale of highly designed products in low volumes. But how do they highlight the detailed craftsmanship at the core of their brand values?

In Ho’s case, her more than a decade of involvement in shoe manufacturing has given her a deep understanding of every aspect of making shoes, from the selection of materials to the actual production.

One facet of that understanding is that leather’s elasticity is directional: it gives in the directions the cow from which it came moved. When manufacturers mass-produce leather shoes, they focus on speed and keeping costs down, and typically ignore the orientation of the leather. This means that their shoes often become stretched out as they age, sometimes to the point that the wearer’s heel may pop out. In contrast, companies producing shoes by hand can take the grain of the leather into account, making the shoes much more expensive, but also much more malleable. Ho says, “Many people think that ‘handmade’ is the same as ‘custom made,’ but shoes that have good malleability shape themselves to the wearer’s feet, which disproves the myth that Asians have wide feet.

Fabric as inspiration

Taiwan’s textiles industry has long manufactured fabrics of outstanding quality for international brands, giving today’s designers easy access to a variety of textiles at prices that are just 60‡70% of their cost overseas.

Originally an interior designer, Maggie ­Chang has since moved into textile design, where she uses her acute sense of 3D space to observe how fabrics change shape when clasped. In her signature products, ­Chang takes advantage of the droop of pleated chiffon to create cloth bags that feel substantial and a bit rumpled.

Vingt Six’s most iconic bags are made from a premium chiffon produced in Taiwan. Born and raised in a center of Taiwanese textile production—He­mei Township in Chang­hua County—Maggie ­Chang makes a point of checking out fabrics in other textile hubs when she travels abroad, but invariably concludes that Chang­hua’s products better suit her needs. “Our skirt-style bags are mainly made with soft chiffon. It doesn’t wrinkle easily, and because the needle count is high, if it snags on something, you can fix it by just trimming it and giving it a little pull. It’s not like most chiffons, which tear all the way through when something gets caught.” Many travelers come from Hong Kong and Macao just to shop, and she shows them how to pack their purchases so they don’t become wrinkled or creased.

Good design in the details

Sisters Yang Chun Chun and Yang Yun Han say they both like outfits, but even after living through years of changing fashions, still have trouble finding styles that suit their small physiques. They began learning patternmaking and then invested their hopes and ideas into their C+H brand. Their style focuses on strong colors—black, white and gray—and irregular, geometric trims, giving a sense of soft exteriors hiding strength within, and creating different looks from the front, back and sides.

The edges of C+H’s clothing are first flattened, hemmed using an overlock to prevent fraying, then sewn again. It makes a sturdier hem than that on mass-­produced clothing, for which the stitching processes are combined to save time.

The value of a designer’s brand is determined by the meticulousness of its craft and the uniqueness of its designs. ­Chang notes that the creases in her skirt-style bags are created by hand. She explains that making them quickly with a machine would make the fabric too flat and eliminate the bags’ “fluffy” feel. She has applied for a patent on her creasing method.

Taiwan has myriad creative and cultural brands, all developing their own visions of the industry. Tai­chung’s geographic advantages and the city government’s program to cultivate creative young entrepreneurs are invigorating the city’s creative and cultural scene. And with young designers communicating with one another and becoming inspired, that scene is flourishing.     

近期文章

日文

台中の路地裏に デザインと工芸が生む輝き

蘇俐穎/photos courtesy of 林旻萱 /tr. by 松本 幸子

創造性と商業的価値の間でいかにバランスをとる か、それは多くのデザイナーが避けては通れない問題だ。しかし、人件費や賃貸料の安い台中では、そうしたプレッシャーは台北ほどではなく、実験を試みる余地が大きいので、若いデザイナーたちはここを起業の地に選ぶ。路地裏の民家を借りた、オリジナルでクリエイティブなショップがここに集まり、互いに刺激を与え合っている。


台湾語の「巷仔内(路地裏)」という言葉は「くろうと」の意味もある。この言葉は、個性的な店が集まる台中の路地裏を表すのにふさわしい。国立美術館を中心に、西区の土庫里や忠信市場、西屯区の大容東西街など、低い建物が並ぶ辺りに、プライベートキッチンや画廊、コーヒーショップ、工房、雑貨屋などが集まり、ちょっとした文化芸術プラットホームのようになっている。オリジナルな商品が並び、店主の創意工夫をこらした店構えで、それぞれのニーズに合った独特の経営が行われ、展覧会や青空市場も催されるなど、あちこちで思わぬ発見ができる。

これまで何度も映画上映会や青空マーケットを企画してきた「小路映画」責任者の黄米露は、「台中の人間はまるで『水滸伝』の登場人物のように不屈で華々しさを好みません。台中のビジネスで大切なのは肩書きではなく人情です」と言う。台中は、台北ほど商業化されておらず、まだ古き良き時代の体質を残す。台北での起業は一人で奮闘することが多いが、台中で長くやるには人とのつながりが大切で、そこから資源や情報を得たり、共同ビジネスが生まれる。

どうやらここでは「人情」のつながりで、自ずとクリエイティブ産業の集合体ができている。

産業クラスターをつなぐ人情

何恵貞と詹怡鈴は、台中の靴メーカーで働いていた。材料メーカーやOEM顧客と連絡を取ったり、型紙作りから、縫製、底付け、仕上げなどすべてをこなして靴製造の技術や知識を身につけた。その工場が閉鎖され、2014年にハンドメイドの靴を売る「藍尼手工鞋」を立ち上げた。デザインと販売をそれぞれ担当し、ベテラン製靴職人に頼んで靴を完成させた。そして「美術園道」商店街の事務局長、陳韻涵の紹介によって、革製品ブランド「森下樹」と共同で五権八街に店舗を構え、品揃え豊富な皮革工房を作った。

一方、「Vingt Six」を創立した張珮は、もとは自分のためにとシフォンでスカート風のバッグを作ったのが始まりだった。それを露天で売るようになり、市場にも出店して、同業の若いデザイナーたちと知り合った。彼らと考えや情報を交換し、共同で工房を借りたり、海外のマーケットにも出店したりした後、2016年末に「C+H」創設者の楊淳淳と楊勻涵の姉妹とともに、デザイナーズブランドの店「女子事務所」を立ち上げた。店内にはVingt Six、C+Hを含め、10の台湾デザイナーズブランドの商品が並ぶ。張珮は「海外ではバッグや帽子を専門に扱う店が多いですが、台湾人の消費習慣に合ったものを売る店なら各種製品をいっしょに扱っても客は足を止めてくれます」と言う。だが、それはもちろん、デザイナー同士の絆に支えられている。

台湾中部は製造業の中心地だ。かつては国際ブランドのOEMが盛んで、皮革、繊維、金属加工工場が林立し、外貨を稼いだ。今では多くが海外移転してしまったが、わずかに残る工場は今でも廉価で質の良い製品を多種作っている。それを材料とするので若い起業家はコストを抑えられ、しかもそこからデザインの発想を得る。また、腕の良いベテラン職人も貴重な資産だ。現代的なセンスと伝統技術を結び付けることで優れた製品が生まれるだけでなく、工芸技術も継承される。彼らが協力して生み出した靴や服を見ていると、製造業の黄金時代が戻ってきたかのようだ。

オーダーメイドでなくても

何恵貞のブランド名「藍尼(Laney)」は、「Lane(路地)」からきており、「くろうと」を暗示したという。ではこれら「くろうとの店」は、製品数が少なく、デザインがおしゃれだというほかに、どんな価値があるのだろう。

製靴業に携わって10年余り、何恵貞は材料選びから製造過程までを熟知する。在庫の革にはカビの生えるリスクがあるので新鮮な革を優先して選ぶ。職人が革のにおいを嗅ぎ、カビのにおいのないことを確認してから爪を立て、油脂や水分をチェックする。「乾き過ぎた革はつまんだだけで破れます。色がきれいでも使えません」

一般には知られていないが、皮革には動物の動く向きによって伸びやすい方向があるという。だが量産される革靴は効率やコストを優先し、革の方向性まで考慮しないので、長く履くうちに伸びてしまうことがある。ハンドメイドでは、職人が革を1枚ごとに引っ張って、弾力のないものや、深い所に傷があったり、虫のいる革をまず淘汰する。それから革を方向に合わせて裁って作るので、コストはかかるが長く履ける靴ができる。何恵貞は「ハンドメイドと言えばオーダーメイドと思っている人が多いですが、靴の展延性が良ければ、長く履くうちに足にフィットします。足が幅広のアジア人でも大丈夫です。オーダーメイドが必要なのは外反母趾や、左右で足の大きさや長さが違うような場合です」と言う。このように細かく吟味して作った靴は、オーダーメイドと同様の良さを持つと言えるかもしれない。

布地からインスピレーション

台湾のアパレル産業は国際ブランドのOEMを主に手がけ、質も高い。デザイナーは各種の布地を入手でき、しかも価格は海外の6~7割だ。楊勻涵は「布はデザイナーにとって発想の泉です。生地の特性からイメージを描き、そこに自分の考えを入れて作品を作ります」と言う。張珮も、一枚の布を見てシフォン・バッグを思いついたという。元インテリア・デザイナーの彼女は立体的にものを捉えるのが得意で、布をつかんでみてその変化に注目する。ドレープを作るシフォンなら、ふわりと膨らんだバッグが作れると考えた。

そこからVint Sixを代表する商品、メイドイン台湾の無地シフォン・バッグが生まれた。紡織業の盛んな彰化和美出身の彼女は、海外旅行の際には必ず布市場に足を運ぶが、布地はやはり故郷のものが最高だと言う。「バッグには目の細かいシフォンを使います。皺になりにくく、引っかけても引っ張って形を整えれば戻ります。普通のシフォンなら破れますが」という。香港やマカオからわざわざ買いに来る人もいるほどだ。彼女はシフォン・バッグの畳み方を教えてくれた。なるほど、畳んだ後また広げても跡が残らない。

細部でわかるデザインの良さ

楊淳淳と楊勻涵は姉妹そろっておしゃれ好きだが、小柄な二人はなかなか気に入るものを見つけられない。楊淳淳は「日本では路地裏でもデザイナーズブランドを見かけ、人々のファッションも個性があります。でも台湾では特別なものはたいてい高価です」と言う。そんな二人は型紙作りから学んでC+Hを立ち上げた。黒、白、グレーなどで幾何学模様を多用、ソフトな中にハードなムードも漂う服を作る。不規則な裁断で、服を着ると前、後ろ、横からでそれぞれ異なる形に見える。そんな細部を縫製担当者と確認するには、普通より多くの時間がかかるという。

精緻な造りとデザインの独創性が、デザイナーズブランドの価値を決める。張珮のシフォン・バッグもドレープは手作業で作る。機械に頼るとドレープがきれいに膨らまないからだ。彼女はすでにこのドレープの特許を申請した。

ブランドが林立し始めた台湾の状況について、海外を見てきた楊勻涵は、「市場の小さい台湾では競争を避け、特徴が重ならないようにすべきです」と言う。台湾経済研究院副研究員の盧俊偉も「創意は競争の中でまた新たな創意を生むもので、そうやって最も優れた創意が残り、また競争し、前進します」と説明する。台中には恵まれた環境があり、市もプロジェクト「星をつかむ青年、夢を築く台中」を打ち出して文化クリエイティブ産業の推進に力を入れる。若いデザイナーたちが交流する、創意あふれる町が発展中だ。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!