Multicultural Hengchun Peninsula

Cycling Provincial Highway 26
:::

2020 / November

Tina Xie /photos courtesy of Kent Chuang /tr. by Phil Newell


Taiwan Provincial Highway 26 is a coastal road that circumnavigates the Hengchun Peninsula. Cycling along it, on one side you see the bright blue sky merging into the ocean, while on the other there are towering green mountain ridges. When you ride into small towns and wander around, it feels like opening an unread page in Taiwan’s history. Mul­tiple ethnic groups have interacted in this area, leaving behind precious historical relics and stories.


This cycling trip starts off in the old walled city of Hengchun. The city wall was built in the 1870s under Qing-­Dynasty rule. Its four gates are all still standing, along with large sections of the old wall, making this Taiwan’s best-preserved walled town. Local residents always use the terms “inside the wall” and “outside the wall” to explain to each other the locations they are headed for or to give outsiders directions. Although this old structure looks a little run down, it still greatly influences the lives of people today.

The young people of Lishan Eco

As we ride along the streets near the West Gate, one storefront grabs our attention: Lishan Eco Company’s “PingTung Life Shop.” The store is a base for community ecotourism. It mainly sells local agricultural products and unique gift and sou­venir items from the Hengchun Peninsula, and travelers looking to arrange a tour can also make inquiries here. Taiwan Panorama visited in 2016 and inter­viewed Lishan Eco’s founder, Miles Lin, looking back over his entre­preneur­ial path and introducing his brick-and-­mortar shop.

Founded in 2012, Lishan Eco has been deeply involved in local community development for over 15 years, and thus far has trained 133 community guides. The number of travelers has increased from a few dozen people a year to several thousand today. “Looking at the annual revenue for the Sheding Community alone, last year it exceeded NT$3 million. All that money goes into the community, providing a livelihood for many residents and young people who have returned to their hometown,” says Lin.

Chen Jyun Rong, who is in charge of training local residents, says that the community guides are mostly between 40 and 65 years of age. They have a lot of experi­ences to share, and training courses taught by university professors have given them additional expert knowledge they wouldn’t otherwise have.

The team at Lishan Eco not only trains the older genera­tion of residents, but also works with them on ­creative projects, reinterpreting time-honored cultural herit­age through the perspective of youth. Lin points to the example of Hengchun folk songs. “They are about life in the past. When our ancestors moved to Taiwan, life was very hard, so they relieved stress by playing the yueqin [a plucked string instrument]. But people listening today cannot easily understand the sorrowful lyrics of these folk songs.” That is why team member Yu Yang Shin Ping adapted the folk songs and formed a band with elderly local women, and together they have played the yueqin at Hengchun’s “Hear Here” world music festival.

The building of Hengchun

For our next stop, we head to the West Gate in search of the history of Hengchun after the construction of the city wall.

We ask Nian Jicheng, an expert in local history and culture, to tell us about the history of the old walled town of Hengchun and to serve as our guide to surround­ing local attractions. Nian’s workshop is called “Lang­qiao” in Chinese, a transliteration of the old Paiwan indigen­ous name for Hengchun, which was known in Dutch Formosa as “Long­kiau.” Nian looks at this land from an indigenous point of view rather than from the Han Chinese perspective.

During the Qing Dynasty, Langqiao was at first ­considered by the imperial court to be outside its effective jurisdiction. But after foreign armed forces under­took punitive expeditions against local indigen­ous people following the Rover and Mudan incidents of 1867 and 1871, the Qing court began to realize the area’s import­ance, and set up a county government to adminis­ter it. Dispatched as an imperial envoy, Viceroy Shen Baozhen changed the name to Hengchun, which means “per­petual spring,” because he found the weather to be spring-like all year round. This new name not only reflected the fact that Hengchun was getting newfound attention from the government, it also symbolized the beginning of a major influx of Han Chinese culture.

Nian Jicheng takes out an old book and compares a map in it with the local topography. He explains with gusto: “The reason they built a fortress in Hengchun was that it had good fengshui! Behind it is Mt. Santai, to the left is Longluan Lake, on the right is Mt. Hutou, and straight ahead there is the protective screen of Mt. Xi­ping.” Inside the walled town lived the authorities of the day, while outside it were the ordinary people.

When we ask Nian why he is so keen on Hengchun history, he says with a laugh: “I can’t help it! I know too many stories!” Many years ago, he discovered a stack of black-and-white photos in his mother’s nightstand, and being curious by nature, he began to invest time in research­ing the history of the Hengchun Peninsula in order to recapture this period in history. Through his investiga­tions he found that the people in the ­photos were Taiwan­ese who had been drafted to serve in Southeast Asia and the Pacific during World War II, when Taiwan was under Japanese rule. They were lined up in ranks in front of Hengchun’s former assembly hall, and one of them was his mother's former husband. Nian’s stepfather was a lighthouse keeper at the ­Eluanbi Lighthouse, so Nian heard many ­stories about the ­surrounding area. Gaining an in-depth under­standing of the peninsula’s history natur­ally became his mission in life.

An ecoguide to Sheding Park

We ride our bicycles along Highway 26 to Sheding Nature Park, where we join in a community ecotour.

When Lai Yongyuan, known to travelers as “Dr. Lai,” introduces plants in the nature park, he connects them to his life experiences, in order to create a bridge between his audience and the plants. For urban dwellers like ourselves, it is like entering a wonderland, as we ooh and ah at every flower and tree around us. Particularly impressive is the journey through the rift valley formed of coral stone, where we witness the scenery produced by movements of the earth’s crust some 300,000 to 500,000 years ago.

“Is that the footprint of a Formosan sika deer?” A tourist with his head lowered, closely examining a print left in the mud, hopes he will be able to see a deer. We follow the tracks and discover that the footprints dis­appear into the woods. Just when the group feels dis­appointed, Lai leads us to another wooded area, where two sika are sticking their heads out and looking straight at us. Surprised and delighted, the group cheers, but very quietly, in order not to startle them.

A crab surveyor at Jialeshui

After riding south to Eluanbi Lighthouse, our road turns north toward Jialeshui, where we stop off at the beach to admire the stars. There we encounter a man wearing a headlamp, with long tongs in one hand and a bucket in the other, searching all around with his head lowered. When we step forward to ask him what he is doing, we notice that there is a crab printed on his clothing. His name is Ku Ching-fang, and he is a land crab surveyor.

In the past, he was a hunter of birds of prey, and was proud of his accurate marksmanship. He was also a ­major headache for the staff of the Kenting National Park Administration, who would hear his shots, but could never catch him. Later, Ku learned that his family was very worried about him being caught, and his daughter had very mixed feelings about what he did after learning about ecological conservation in school. As a result, he put aside his rifle and gave up hunting.

When first making the transition, Ku still felt an itchy trigger finger. But after going through an internal struggle, he overcame his desire to hunt and decided to become an ecological volunteer. Over the past few years he has traveled with scholars to Australia’s Christmas Island, where he exchanged ideas with local researchers and learned the ecological conservation techniques they use. Having gone from “bird killer” to “crab guardian angel,” he is now completely dedicated to surveying and protecting the land crabs of Manzhou Township, and a graduate student even named a new species after him—Parasesarma kui—in recognition of his indefatigable work.

Cultural diversity on the East Coast

There is a historic path in Manzhou Township, called the Mancha Ancient Trail because it runs between Manzhou and Chashan. In days gone by Seqalu indigenous people would use this trail to go to the coast to catch fish, and in the era of Japanese rule, young students attending classes to learn Japanese also followed this path, so it is also called the “Fishing Road” or the “Student Road.”

The Manzhou Japanese language school was the first of 14 such schools set up around Taiwan during the era of Japanese rule. Also, at that time the head of Kōshon Chō (as the local Hengchun government was known in Japanese) was Sagara Nagatsuna, former president of Okinawa Teacher Training College. These facts reveal how determined the Japanese government was to indoctrin­ate the indigenous peoples of the area.

Bearing down on the pedals of our bikes, we press on northward to the indigenous community of Macaran (Chinese name Xuhai) to explore local indigenous ­culture.

Pan Chengqing, the head of the Xuhai Community Development Association, says: “In the winter a lot of cyclists come here to soak in the hot springs. At only NT$150 per visit, it’s very cheap.” In 1887, Jagarushi Guri Bunkiet, a Seqalu chief, took the British adventurer George Taylor to Taitung, and along the route they stumbled upon the Xuhai Hot Spring emerging from gaps in the rock. Later on residents put up a structure here and a hot spring area took shape. Pan Chengqing recalls that because the hot spring was located near the primary school, mothers would always tell their children to wash up there before coming home. Some students would rub shampoo into their hair before leaving home in the mornings so they could jump into the water to wash themselves right after school.

For our last stop we head to the Alangyi Historic Trail. Guided by local resident Rang Rang, we enter the trail at Daren Township in Taitung. Before heading up into the mountains, we first must traverse a 750-meter-­long shingle beach, with waves from the Pacific Ocean continually slapping against the shore and their booming sounds filling the air. Rang Rang says that depend­ing on the season, the waves will shape the rocks in different ways, and the trash floating in the sea will be carried onto different places along the beach.

After about an hour on the uphill trail, we finally reach the peak. Looking down, we see two sea turtles floating in the azure ocean, and Rang Rang quips: “It’s pretty hard to take an ugly photo from here!”

Looking out over the magnificent ocean, we think of the history and stories we have heard over the past few days. We suddenly realize that the Hengchun Peninsula is beautiful not only because of its mountains and sea, but also because of the collective memories left behind by the interactions between multiple ethnic groups. It is these precious cultures that have created the unique charm of this piece of land.

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

繁體 日本語

恆春半島 古調新唱

騎行台26線

文‧謝宜婷 圖‧莊坤儒

台26線是一條環繞恆春半島的濱海公路,騎行時轉頭一望,淡藍的天空與大海連成一片,另一邊則是高聳亮綠的山際線。騎進小鎮晃晃,像是翻開一頁從未讀過的台灣歷史,多元民族在這塊土地互動,留下珍貴的遺跡與故事。


 

這趟騎行從恆春古城開始,鎮上四座城門在清朝時期建立,是台灣保存最完整的古城。當地居民總是以「城內」、「城外」向彼此說明待會要去的位置,或以此指引外地人方向,100多年前的建築,外觀雖有些毀壞,卻深刻影響著現代人的生活。

森社場所的年輕人們

騎在西城門附近的街道上,有一間店的名字抓住了我們的目光:「森社場所」。

「森」林加上「社」區,原來是一處做社區生態旅遊的地方,店內以販售恆春半島在地農產及特色伴手禮為主,旅客若有行程安排的需求,也可以在這裡諮詢。《光華》團隊曾在2016年到此拜訪,採訪「里山生態公司」創辦人林志遠,回顧其創業歷程並介紹他經營的實體店面「森社場所」。

2012年創立的里山,其團隊成員從研究所時期,就已經開始與墾丁國家公園管理處合作輔導社區,深入在地15年,如今已幫助11個社區,開發46條路線,培訓133位社區解說員。旅客人數從一開始幾十人,成長到現在幾千人,「而年營收光看社頂社區,去年就有300多萬,全部進入社區,養活很多居民與返鄉青年。」林志遠說。

負責安排社區培訓的陳俊融表示,社區解說員年齡大約40~65歲,在他們的生活場域裡,有很多故事可以講,再加上大學教授的培訓課程,補足了專業知識的不足。社區老師們態度積極,他回憶有位老師曾說:「昆蟲的課我都上過啦!我想上一點蕨類的。」甚至有老師今年已經上了200個小時的培訓課程,遠遠超出要求的時數。

里山的團隊,除了培訓老一輩的居民,也與他們一起創作,用年輕的視角,呈現經典的文化資產。林志遠以恆春民謠為例,「那唱的是以前的生活,先人移民到台灣後,因為生活很苦,所以藉著彈月琴紓壓,但現代人很難理解民謠悲情的曲調。」於是團隊成員余楊心平改編民歌,與奶奶們合組民謠團,一起彈月琴,參加半島歌謠祭。

「民謠有六個調,是固定的,但是歌詞可以有各式主題,有奶奶就會唱她煮滷肉飯、青草茶的日常生活。」余楊心平分享。

問起他們加入里山的源由,陳俊融與余楊心平表示兩人都曾在墾管處當替代役,跟著所屬機關輔導社區,後來就被林志遠邀請加入團隊。雖然他們都不是在地人,卻因著恆春的生態與人情味,以及對社區的牽絆而留了下來。「雖然有時與社區溝通會產生摩擦,但他們其實已經認同我們,把我們當成家人。」兩人笑著回答。

恆春建城,地位翻轉

下一站,前往西門,尋找恆春建城後的歷史。

我們邀請在地文史工作者──念吉成老師,講解恆春古城的歷史,並導覽周遭景點。他的工作室取名「瑯嶠」,是排灣族對恆春的古稱,以原住民的角度來看這塊土地,而不只是從漢人的觀點出發。

瑯嶠在清朝時期,原本被朝廷視為化外之地,但是羅妹號事件、牡丹社事件等外國武裝犯台的行動接連發生後,清廷才開始意識到其重要性,並設縣治理。被派遣到當地的欽差大臣沈葆楨認為這地四季如春,因此取名「恆春」。這個新地名不只反映恆春開始受到政府重視,也象徵漢人文化開始大量進入。

念吉成拿出古書,指著上面的地圖,對照實際地景,津津有味地解釋著:「會設城在恆春是因為風水好!後面有三台山,左邊有龍鑾潭,右邊有虎頭山,前面還有西平山做屏障。」城內住著當時的權勢人家,城外則是一般平民。

西門城內的廣寧宮,依傍在一塊如山的巨石上,氣勢雄偉。但念吉成說:「那可不是山,而是隆起的珊瑚礁。」深藏在海底的珊瑚礁,隨著地殼變動,抬升至陸地上,清朝的官員還在上面蓋涼亭,招待賓客,直到第二次世界大戰爆發,炸毀了上面的遺跡。現在此處成為猴洞山史蹟公園,旅客可拾階而上,環繞小山丘一圈。

問起念吉成為何如此熱衷恆春歷史,他笑著說:「我不得不做啊!我身上太多故事了!」多年前,他在母親的床頭櫃發現一疊黑白照片,好奇的他為了還原這段歷史,開始投入恆春半島的文史研究。經過考察,他發現照片內是日治時期被徵召至南洋的台灣人,正在當時恆春公會堂前列隊集合,其中一位正是他母親前段婚姻的先生。再加上他的養父是鵝鑾鼻燈塔看守,因此時常聽到附近一帶的故事。自然而然,深度了解半島歷史,成為他的使命。

社頂公園的生態解說員

我們沿著台26線,騎到社頂公園,參加社區生態導覽。

「各位嘉賓,這邊請!」今年70幾歲的賴永源,穿著印有社頂徽章的導覽衣服,指示著旅客前進的方向。然後中氣十足地介紹:「這是大葉山蘭,又稱蘭嶼芒果。」「這是咬人狗,上面的蟻酸會讓皮膚發癢,你不小心碰到,可以用鹼性的姑婆芋來中和,但要小心它的塊莖有毒。」「這是過山香,又稱番仔香草,以前原住民山上的工作結束,會拔下幾葉搓一搓,消除汗臭。」

被旅客稱為「賴博士」的賴永源,介紹植物時會連結生活經驗,拉近旅客與植物的距離。而對平常生活在都市的我們,如入大觀園般,對身旁的一花一木不斷嘖嘖稱奇。尤其在穿越珊瑚礁形成的裂谷時,親眼見證了30-50萬年前地殼擠壓產生的奇景。

「這腳印是梅花鹿的嗎?」有旅客低著頭,仔細觀察泥土上的蹤跡,期待能看見梅花鹿一眼。我們循著線索,發現腳印的盡頭消失在樹林裡,一行人正失望時,賴永源帶領大家走向另一處的樹林,兩隻梅花鹿正好探頭出來,直愣愣地盯著我們看,眾人又驚又喜,小聲地歡呼著,避免驚動牠們。

再往前走,剛好有兩位墾管處的生態志工在調查蝴蝶,雖然兩人年紀稍長,但介紹起蝴蝶的名字、花色與蛹,活力可不輸年輕人。「這是大白斑蝶的黃金蛹,漂不漂亮!」一位志工得意地指著他手機裡的照片,露出了笑容。生活在恆春半島上的人們,總是可以自信地去守護並分享自己土地上的美好事物。 

佳樂水的陸蟹調查員

騎車一路向南,途經鵝鑾鼻拍照留念後,我們前往衝浪勝地──佳樂水。

走在鵝鑾鼻到佳樂水的這段路上,想起念吉成提過的歷史。原本台1線只延伸至鵝鑾鼻,但是,在前滿州鄉長尤欽榮的努力下,政府向東開闢這段新公路,成為台26線的第一段(楓港──佳樂水)。

當年,行政院長蔣經國南下拜訪朋友,受時任鄉長的尤欽榮邀請,沿著珊瑚礁小路,前往參觀附近的瀑布。抵達之後,蔣經國欣賞著美景,詢問這地地名,眾人回答:「加落水(台語)」,意思是「天上掉下來的泉水」,但蔣經國認為這個名字不夠文雅,因此親自命名為「佳樂水」。

佳樂水附近一帶,原是軍事重地,當時政府也沒有預算闢路,但尤欽榮認為興建「佳鵝公路」能將墾丁的遊客導引至佳樂水,促進當地觀光收入,在他的力爭之下,蔣經國於是答應了這個請求。

夜晚,到佳樂水附近的海灘觀星,遇見一位男子頭戴探照燈,一手握著長夾,一手提著水桶,低頭到處尋覓。上前詢問時,才發現他的衣服上印著一隻螃蟹,而他的名字是古清芳,一位陸蟹調查員。

過去,他是老鷹獵人,以精準的槍法自豪,但也令墾管處頭痛不已,每次只聽到他的槍聲,卻抓不到他的人。直到後來,古清芳發現家人常為他提心吊膽,尤其是女兒在學校聽見生態保育的宣導時,心裡五味雜陳,於是,他放下獵槍,不再冒險。

轉變初期,古清芳還是會「手癢」,但內心經過一番天人交戰,他放棄了打獵的欲望,決定成為一名生態志工。這幾年,他跟著學者到澳洲的聖誕島,與當地研究員交流,學習生態保育工法。現在的他全心投入滿州陸蟹的調查與保育,甚至有研究生以他的姓氏命名新品種為「古氏擬相手蟹」,感謝他多年在此領域的貢獻。

東海岸的多元文化

在滿州鄉,有一條歷史悠遠的古道,介於滿州與茶山,因此名為「滿茶古道」。昔日原住民斯卡羅族人會經過這條路去海邊捕魚,而在日治時期,國語傳習所的小學生也會走這條路去上學,因此,又稱「捕魚路」、「學生路」。

日治時期,全台總共有14間日語傳習所,滿州是第一個建校的地方,而當時的恆春廳長,是前沖繩縣師範學校校長相良長綱,可以窺見日本想要教化原住民的決心。

滿州鄉生態旅遊觀光促進會理事長馬仙妹告訴我們,滿茶古道與南仁山是社區主要的生態旅遊路線,雖然近期旅客不多,但是對生態保育有熱情的她相信,只要有一、兩個人聽進去保育的觀念,他們的努力就值得了。

踩著腳下踏板,向北前往旭海部落,一探當地原住民文化。從清朝開始,政府稱恆春一帶的原住民為「瑯嶠十八番社」,斯卡羅族大頭目卓杞篤與養子潘文杰,常在外交衝突發生時,負責居中斡旋。日治時期,潘文杰的後代遷徙至旭海部落,因此現在部落裡,有許多人姓「潘」。在這裡也可以看到阿美族、排灣族與卑南族等多元族群的生活面貌。

旭海社區發展協會理事長潘呈清說:「冬天很多騎腳踏車的,會來這裡泡溫泉,一次150元而已,很便宜。」1887年,潘文杰帶著英國探險家泰勒前往台東,途中發現從石縫冒出來的旭海溫泉,後來居民蓋了屋子,形成溫泉區。潘呈清也回憶,因為溫泉就位在國小附近,媽媽總是會叫孩子洗完溫泉再回家,於是有同學出門時,靈機一動往頭上擠洗髮精,下課後就可以直接跳進水裡洗澡。

最後一站,我們前往阿朗壹古道,由當地人穰懹擔任導覽員,從台東達仁進入。上山前,會先經過750公尺長的礫灘,太平洋來的海浪不斷拍打海岸,空氣中充斥著「轟!轟!」的聲響。穰懹說,在不同季節,石頭會被海浪磨塑出不同的面貌,海漂垃圾也會被帶到海灘上不同的位置。

走過一階又一階的石梯,想像著先民穿越時的艱辛,穰懹告訴我們:「排灣族迎娶的時候,還要扛轎走呢!」小時候他也常跟著長輩來這裡採月桃葉,收穫滿滿地回家。貼心的他,每走大約20階,就會喊:「停~休息一下!」經過大約一小時,我們攻頂了。向下一望,湛藍的海洋裡有兩隻海龜漂浮著,穰懹打趣地說:「這裡拍照要拍醜,很困難喔!」

望著壯闊的海景,回想這幾天聽見的歷史故事。突然發現,恆春半島的美,不只在其大山大海,還有多元民族相遇、互助,留下來的集體記憶。這些珍貴的文化,造就了這塊土地獨特的魅力。

恒春半島の豊かな文化に触れる

自転車で行く台26号線の旅

文・謝宜婷 写真・莊坤儒 翻訳・松本 幸子

台26号線は恒春半島の海岸沿いを走る幹線道路で、片側には青い空と大海原が広がり、もう片側には緑の山脈が連なる。沿道の小さな町に寄れば、まるで新たな台湾史のページをめくるかのように、そこには多様な民族の営みがあり、貴重な旧跡や物語に出会える。


今回の自転車の旅は、古都の恒春からスタートする。町には清の時代に建てられた城門が四つとも残り、昔の姿をよく留めている。住人たちも場所や方向を指すのに「城内」「城外」と言うことが多く、人々の暮らしに溶け込んでいる。

「森社場所」の若者たち

西城門近くの道で見かけた店の名が我々の注意を引いた。「森社場所」とある。

地域のエコツアーを催す店だった。店内では農産品やお土産が売られ、旅の情報も提供する。『光華』取材チームが2016年にこの地を訪れた際に取材した「里山生態公司」の創設者、林志遠に、創業の頃のことや彼の経営する「森社場所」について語ってもらうことにした。

2012年設立の「里山」は、スタッフがまだ大学院に在籍していた頃に、墾丁国立公園管理処と共同で活動を始めていた。それから15年、11地区で計46ルートを開発し、133名のガイドを養成、客も当初は数十人だったのが今や数千人に成長した。「収益は社頂地区だけでも昨年は300万元余り、そのすべてが住民や故郷にUターンした若者の収入となりました」と林志遠は言う。

人材育成を担当する陳敏融によれば、地区ガイドは40~65歳で、地元のことに詳しいだけでなく、大学のコースも受講して専門知識を補う。皆とても熱心で「昆虫についてのコースは全部履修したから、次はシダ類について学びたい」と言う人もいれば、必要な履修時間をはるかに超えて200時間も学んだ人もいる。

「里山」では中高年の人材養成だけでなく、創作も行う。若者の視点で文化遺産を再現させようというのだ。林志遠は恒春の民謡を例に挙げる。「移民たちが生活のつらさを、月琴をつま弾きながら歌ったもので、現代人にはその悲しさが伝わりません」そこでスタッフの余楊心平がポップな曲にアレンジし、おばあさんたちとフォークグループを作って半島での歌謡祭に参加した。

「民謡には六つの調べがありますが、歌詞はさまざまです。庶民の料理やお茶について歌うおばあさんもいます」と余楊心平が説明する。

なぜ「里山」に加わったのか問うと、陳俊融と余楊心平の二人は、兵役の代替役で墾丁の管理処で働いた際に、仕事で地域活動に関わるようになり、後に林志遠に誘われたのだという。地元出身ではないが、縁があって恒春の自然や人とつながり、この地にとどまった。「時には住民ともめることもありますが、それでも彼らはすでに我々を身内と見てくれています」と二人は笑った。

清朝による恒春建設

次は西門に向かう。恒春の町が作られた歴史を探るためだ。

我々が招いた地元の歴史家は念吉成、この古都の歴史を解説し、案内してくれる。彼の仕事場の「瑯嶠」という名は、パイワン語による「恒春」の古称だ。漢人の観点でなく、原住民族の視点でこの地を捉えようとの思いを込めた。

瑯嶠は、清朝からは「化外の地」とされていたが、羅妹号事件や牡丹社事件など外国からの出兵事件が続いたため、県が置かれた。この地に派遣された欽差大臣の沈葆楨が、四季を通じて春のようなこの地を「恒春」と名づけた。新しい名は、朝廷による認識の印だっただけでなく、漢人文化の大量の流入も意味していた。

念吉成は古い地図を指して興味深げに「恒春に町を作ったのは風水が良かったからです。後ろには三台山、左には龍鑾潭、右には虎頭山があり、前の西平山は屏風代わりになっています」と説明してくれた。城内には地位や権力のある人が、城外には一般人が暮らした。

西門の内側にある広陵宮は山のように巨大な岩が背後にそびえ、堂々とした姿だ。だが念吉成によれば「山ではなく、隆起したサンゴ礁です」という。地殻の変動によって陸上に現れたサンゴ礁で、清朝の役人がその上に東屋を建てて客をもてなしたというが、第二次世界大戦で東屋は爆破されてしまった。現在は猴洞山史跡公園となり、石段を上っていけば丘を一周できる。

恒春の歴史に夢中な理由を問うと、念吉成は笑って「仕方ないのですよ。自分の周りには物語が多くて」と言う。何年も前のこと、母親のベッドの枕元の引き出しから白黒写真がどっさり出てきた。それで興味がわき、恒春半島の歴史研究を始めたという。大戦中に南洋戦線へと赴く台湾兵の写真もあった。恒春公会堂前で隊列を組んでおり、その中には母の先夫、尤保生もいた。また養父が鵞鑾鼻の灯台守をしていた関係で周辺の物語もよく聞いていた。こうして自ずと半島の歴史を探ることが自分の使命になったのだという。

そのまま台26号線を進み、社頂公園に到着、地区エコツアーに参加した。

社頂公園の生態ガイド

「みなさん、こちらへ」70歳になる頼永源が社頂のマークのついたガイド服を着て、力強い声で解説を始めた。「これはオオバアカテツの木、蘭嶼マンゴーとも呼ばれます」「こちらはイラノキ、表面のギ酸にふれると皮膚がかゆくなるので気を付けてください。アルカリ性のクワズイモで中和できますが、クワズイモには毒があるのでやはり注意を」「これは『過山香(ムクロジの仲間)』で『番仔香草』とも呼ばれます。かつて原住民族が山での仕事を終えた後、この葉をもみほぐして汗のにおいを消しました」

客に「頼博士」と呼ばれる頼永源は、暮らしと結びつけて植物を紹介する。都会暮らしの我々はひとつひとつに感心するばかりだ。サンゴ礁の谷を通り抜ける際も、30~50万年前の地殻変動による不思議な風景に目を見張った。

「この足跡はタイワンジカですか」と客の一人が聞くので、シカが見られるかと期待したが、足跡をたどると林の中へと消えていた。がっかりしていると頼永源は別の林に連れて行ってくれた。するとシカが2頭こちらを見つめている。驚かせないよう皆は小さな声で歓声を上げた。

さらに進むと、墾丁国立公園管理処の生態ボランティアが蝶の調査をしていた。二人とも若くはないが、蝶を熱く語る様子は若者と変わらない。一人がスマホの写真を示し、「これはオオゴマダラの黄金サナギです。きれいでしょう」と笑顔を見せる。恒春の人々は誇りをもって自分たちの宝を守り、それを皆に紹介する。

佳楽水の陸ガニ調査員

さらに南へと自転車を走らせる。鵞鑾鼻で記念撮影の後、サーフィンの人気スポット、佳楽水に向かった。

念吉成がしてくれた話を思い出す。昔は鵞鑾鼻までしか台1号線が来ていなかったが、満州郷長だった尤欽栄の尽力で東へと延長され、台26号線の最初の区間(楓港—佳楽水)となった。

その年、行政院長だった蒋経国が南部を訪れ、尤欽栄郷長の招きで近くの滝を見に行った。美しい風景を見て蒋経国が地名を問うと、台湾語で「加落水」、「天から落ちてくる泉」という意味だと答えた。それを聞いた蒋経国が漢字を換えて「佳楽水」と命名したのだという。

佳楽水一帯は軍事的要所なのだが、当時は道路を作る予算がなかった。だが尤欽栄が「道路が開通すれば墾丁に来た客が佳楽水まで足を延ばし、観光収入となる」と強く主張したため、蒋経国がその要求を聞き入れたのだという。

夜、佳楽水近くの海岸に星を見に行くと、頭にライトをつけた男性がゴミばさみとバケツを提げ、うつむいて何かを探している。近づくと服にカニがプリントされていた。名前は古清芳で、陸ガニ調査員なのだと言う。

かつてはタカを追うハンターで、正確な射撃を誇った。だが管理処にとっては、銃声はすれど姿の見えない彼は頭痛のタネだった。やがて自分の家族も心配しているのだと知る。とりわけ娘が学校で自然保護の大切さを学んできた時には複雑な心境になり、ついに彼は猟銃を捨てた。

最初はそれでも手がうずいたが、さまざまな葛藤を経て、ついに狩りへの思いは捨て、生態ボランティアになろうと決めた。ここ数年、彼は学者についてオーストラリアのクリスマス島に行き、現地研究者と交流したり生態系保全の方法を学んだりしている。満州の陸ガニ調査と保護に全力を注ぐ彼の貢献に感謝し、ある学生が新種のカニに彼の名を用い、「古氏擬相手蟹(カクベンケイガニの仲間)」と命名したほどだ。

東海岸の多様な文化

満州郷にも古道があり、満州と茶山をつなぐので「満茶古道」という。古くには原住民族スカロ族が浜辺へ漁に行くのに使い、日本統治時代には国語伝習所に通う小学生の通学路だった。そのため「捕魚路」「学生路」とも呼ばれた。

日本統治時代に台湾全土に作られた14の国語伝習所のうち、満州は最初の学校だった。当時の恒春庁長だった相良長綱は沖縄県師範学校の元校長でもあり、原住民族を教化しようという当時の日本の決意がうかがえる。

満州郷生態旅遊観光促進会理事長の馬仙妹はこう語る。満茶古道と南仁山はこの地区の主要なエコツアー・ルートで、まだ参加者は少ないがそのうち一人でも二人でも生態保護の大切さをわかってくれたら自分たちの努力はむくわれると。

さらに北へと、原住民文化の豊かな旭海集落を目指す。清代に恒春一帯の原住民族は「瑯嶠十八番社」と呼ばれ、民族間で衝突が起きた際には、スカロ族の大頭目だった卓杞篤と養子の潘文杰が調停を担った。日本統治時代になって潘文杰の子孫が旭海集落に移り住んだため、現在も集落には「潘」姓の家が多い。またここではアミ族、パイワン族、プユマ族など多様な暮らしがある。

旭海地区発展協会理事長の潘呈清は「冬にはサイクリストが温泉目当てに来ます。入浴料150元、安いですよ」と言う。1887年、潘文杰がイギリス人探検家テイラーを連れて訪れ、温泉を発見した。後に小屋が建てられて温泉スポットとなった。潘呈清は子供の頃を思い出す。温泉は小学校から近く、温泉に入ってから帰宅するよう母親によく言われた。それで同級生の一人は、朝出かける前に頭にシャンプーをつけて出かけ、放課後そのまま温泉に入って洗っていた。

最後のスポット、阿朗壱古道に向かう。地元の穰懹がガイド役で、台東の達仁から入った。山に入る前に750メートル続く砂利浜を通ると、太平洋の波が打ちつける音が響く。穰懹によれば、季節によって海岸の砂利の形は異なり、海のゴミも異なる場所に打ち上げられるそうだ。

石段を上りながら先人の苦労を想像した。穰懹が「パイワン族の嫁入りでは輿を担いで上ったのですよ」と言う。彼も幼い頃よくここでゲットウの葉を摘んだ。20段ほど上るたびに彼が気をつかって休憩の声をかけてくれる。1時間ほどで上に着いた。青い海を見下ろすとウミガメが2匹浮かんでいる。穰懹が「ここで美しくない写真を撮るのは難しいでしょう」と笑った。

広がる海を眺めながら、ここ数日にふれた歴史を思い出して気づいた。恒春半島の美は自然だけでなく、多くの民族が出会い、助け合い、残した集団的記憶でもある。そうした優れた文化がこの地の独特な魅力を作り上げているのだと。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!